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QPO
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« on: October 16, 2009, 11:53:24 PM »

It was raised in a discussion last night with dance acquaintances, that we have a lot of teachers but no enough coaches.What is the difference between a teacher and a coach? Is there a difference at all.

I would like to hear the views of others Smiley
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elisedance
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2009, 01:21:01 AM »

I think we touched on this once before - or maybe I'm remembering back to some other distant place Cheesy Embarrassed  But its a good question anyway Q and worth a topic. 

I think the answer depends to some extent on where you are. 

To me you can separate them a couple of ways.  First, a beginners instructor is almost always called a 'teacher' while an advanced dancer's instructor is often called a 'coach'.  Thus, coaching is more hands off and may also be less frequent.

There is another distinction here that may be a NA use of the word.  A teacher is the every-day instructor whereas a coach may be more occasional (and again advanced).  In pro/am you have a teacher/student relationship with your pro partner.  However, you can also have a lesson from a visiting expert (it is generall implied that that expert is, if not more accomplished at least more teaching-experienced than your partner), that expert is then referred to as a coach.

I'm sure there are other used for the term.

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TangoDancer
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« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2009, 02:54:16 AM »

In education, say in the US, there are Bachelors. Masters, and PHDs. A teacher, who is not certified, may be called a teacher if he/she is working professionally. A person w/ certification (bachelor's) is more often referred to as teacher. One who has surpassed this level of education to acquire the next level of certification (master's) is referred to as coach. Those who have acheived an even higher level of certification through education/experience (PHD) are referred to as master coach.

A subset of this would be when one of higher expertise, w/wo certification works on a specific area, genre, skill (i.e. a coach came to work on arm styling, etc).
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2009, 03:22:58 AM »

I posted this a while back on another tread, so I am not going to write it again. I looked in Webster Dictionary and this is what it said. A teacher of a person that is hired and paid to teach! A coach is a person that “tutors” or “instruct”.

This is how the definition on Teacher/Coach and Partner as it is described in many European countries. 

Teacher:  They have often competed to the highest level and received numerous awards for their accomplishments. They have trained to the highest level of expertise possible in their field. They have also been examined to one of the highest level in their field. They are often referred to as “experts” or holding doctorate degrees in their field. To be a teacher is the highest level of achievement possible of the field.

(You are allowed to put “Teacher” on your business stationary but the use of the word “coach” is not allowed).

(In most European countries you are not allowed to put the word “teacher” unless you are certified as such (government rule). Most European countries has now develop a 3 - 5 year education program to certify teachers and so that they are able to call themselves “teacher/s”. They must hold at least 10 years of experience in their sport to get fully certified. In some contries you are not allowed to open a dance school unless you are certified as a teacher as a way to do some quality control.)


Coach: They are trained for a short time for the most part a maximum of 1 – 3 year. They have been examined to the 1st or/and 2nd level. They are there to re-enforce the information and exercises that the teacher taught and prescribed. They are there for the daily training of the sports person. They are not trained to give technical advice or information. Their main purpose is to help/support and encourage the sports person to stay focused and on target. (….to wipe the tears and “asset” when needed (sorry my comment) Wink Tongue)

(You are allowed to put “Coach” on your business stationary but use of the word “Teacher” is not allowed).

It is possible to have both the Teachers’ and the Coaches’ exam and you will then be able to use both titles on the business stationary. The word “Teacher” must however appear first as that is the higher education.

I know that all my teachers in England would have been very offended if I had called them “coach/es”. I remember one time hearing a student calling my main teacher for “coach”. I remember all of us regular students (of the studio) bowing our heads and thinking “ohhhh dear”. My teacher proceeded to tell him that, he was much more educated then what a coach was and that it was very disrespectful to call any of the teachers in the studio for a “coach”.

Dora-Satya Veda

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QPO
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2009, 02:58:02 AM »

I think the terms of Teacher and Coach have become blurred and one is seen as the other and not that different, which of course they are. It is about reeducating those that have got confused.

but do you need both a teacher and a coach? and what roles should each one play
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2009, 12:17:35 AM »

The terms are blurred in contemporary BR language. Making it more iffy is when the teacher is a coach. Yet, I agree that though the 2 can be one in the same, as titles, they mean 2 completely different things. Besides what we referenced on Posted on: October 18, 2009, 02:54:16 AMPosted by: TangoDancer , simply speaking, a coach specializes in creating/trainng/developing the specificities of dance that are designed to get the very best from the dancer.
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elisedance
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« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2009, 05:45:28 AM »

The terms are blurred in contemporary BR language. Making it more iffy is when the teacher is a coach. Yet, I agree that though the 2 can be one in the same, as titles, they mean 2 completely different things. Besides what we referenced on Posted on: October 18, 2009, 02:54:16 AMPosted by: TangoDancer , simply speaking, a coach specializes in creating/trainng/developing the specificities of dance that are designed to get the very best from the dancer.
It appears there are regional differences in the meaning - DSV's take in england (where the trainers preferred teacher over coach) is almost the opposite of the way they are generally used in NA. 

Interesting how the word is used in context here.  I mean you never have a coach at school, you have a teacher.  However, if you need extra training on something you might go and get 'coached' but by a teacher Wink

In almost all sports its the 'coach' and getting 'coached' - you don't have a football teacher...  Ballroom may be unique with the use of teacher.  Perhaps thats because its roots are in social dancing, not competetive. 

Maybe in time a ballroom teacher will be for how to dance whereas a ballroom coach will be for competetive dancing (dancesport)?  Might be a useful distinction......
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« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2010, 01:14:36 AM »

A teacher tries his/her best (should at least) to teach you something, whether you learn or not is your own problem.

A coach beats the living day light out of you until you perform.

 Roll Eyes
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elisedance
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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2010, 01:51:45 AM »

A teacher tries his/her best (should at least) to teach you something, whether you learn or not is your own problem.

A coach beats the living day light out of you until you perform.

 Roll Eyes
Love it!  I think thats exactly it.
In which case my pro is my pro-am teacher.  I wish he could also be my AM coach... but maybe thats not possible.
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« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2010, 04:01:44 AM »

I think a coach is more concerned with your welfare, dancing, and general progress. A teacher would just teach the material, not bothering to check how you are going, whether you are having trouble, or even tailor it to your learning style.
I'd consider our private lesson teacher/coaches as coaches, because they are really very good with making sure we understand, and making the experience fun and worthwhile. I'd call our group lessons teacher/coach a teacher, because he just teaches out of the book, regardless of whether what he's explaining is making any sense.
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QPO
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« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2010, 04:30:05 AM »

It also can depend on regional interpretations, those that call themselves teachers would also think they offer the same as your coach.
Although I think there is a difference between the two
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