partnerdanceonline.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 23, 2014, 01:57:14 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
A lot of people are visiting Smiley Smiley
Undecided Undecided but not many are posting....
please say hi Cheesy
116470 Posts in 1856 Topics by 221 Members
Latest Member: EVE_Dance
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  partnerdanceonline.com
|-+  Partner Dancing
| |-+  Social dancin' (Moderators: QPO, Lioness, ZPomeroy)
| | |-+  Floorcraft on the social floor
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 Print
Author Topic: Floorcraft on the social floor  (Read 6733 times)
QPO
Moderator
Continental Champion
****
Posts: 20824


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2010, 11:28:09 PM »


and you could always eat it if you get peckish in the quickstep... just be careful of your partner's gown...

If Q's partner has a gown...she would have to be careful indeed.

Shocked   Embarrassed 
good catch.  thats the trouble with Q and V having very similar avatars - too easy for me to mix up.



not anymore! problem solvered Tongue
Logged

Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
QPO
Moderator
Continental Champion
****
Posts: 20824


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #31 on: February 13, 2010, 11:29:08 PM »

I dont know if floorcraft on the social floor will ever been fixed, but as I have mentioned I am more choosy as to where I dance... Roll Eyes
Logged

Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
Graham
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 38


« Reply #32 on: March 23, 2010, 09:40:52 AM »

Salsa safety - I dance with my heels very high in tight situations. That means I usually have my heels higher than the person trying to step on me. At 210 lbs, that's a lot of weight coming down (without mercy - mmmmwwwuuuuuuhahahaha evil laugh).
Standard - high elbows, aimed at the top of the back (not the neck), very painful.
Latin - New Yorkers (or similar) right at them (but staying within your own space and stopping before YOU hit them, if they continue to move and hit themselves, that's a different story). Alternately turning box type steps to define your space.

I always try to put myself between my partner and the idiot other dancer (I've never come across a person deliberately trying to hit me, so they must just be inconsiderate or stupid).

One the occasion someone bumps into me (I haven't bumped into anyone for years, literally, I have always stopped moving in the direction of the other BEFORE contact is made) I always apologise first. I try to be nice. Often happens that the other person then verbally attacks me. NOT a good idea, my evil twin surfaces rapidly (15 years in the martial arts, I don't back down, but never throw the first strike - and have never had to strike in any case). The other couple usually leaves the dance floor at this point (and occasionally leaves the dance hall).

Graham
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #33 on: March 23, 2010, 04:59:09 PM »

Wow.  Next time we run up on the bruiser and his doll I'm calling for The Avenging Graham!!
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Derekweb
pre-bronze

Posts: 6


« Reply #34 on: March 27, 2010, 09:49:28 AM »

Graham I had a similar experience. 
 
A couple was rushing toward my DW and I, and my hand quickly touched his back lightly to warn him that we were in his path (college ballroom team practicing at social - he was cutting across LOD wildly).    This was only a light touch and a reflex from past Kung-fu training.   DW only saw the quick motion and though I struck him.
 
It took me the rest of the evening to convince her that years of reflex training a can not be turned off and on.
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #35 on: March 27, 2010, 10:01:22 AM »

Hi Derekweb - welcome to PDO  - and I hope the other guy lived to tell the tale Cheesy

Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
QPO
Moderator
Continental Champion
****
Posts: 20824


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #36 on: March 28, 2010, 12:00:19 AM »

V does the same thing, I have been  almost bunny chopped on several occasions as in NV those arms can go everywhere. Shocked
Logged

Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
SwingWaltz
Gold Star
***
Posts: 5772


« Reply #37 on: April 01, 2010, 11:50:31 PM »

V does the same thing, I have been  almost bunny chopped on several occasions as in NV those arms can go everywhere. Shocked

Oh yes they can!  Shocked
Logged
waltzelf
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 200


« Reply #38 on: April 06, 2010, 03:00:39 AM »

I've discovered (though competition, but it applies equally on the social floor), two very simple - and yet effective - ways to solve problems that other leads seem to have with basic floor etiquette and floorcraft.

1) This is the simplest of all. Confront them. Last year we did a competition. There was a foxtrot, My partner and I went into a picture line sequence in a corner. And by corner, I really do mean corner. It's purely for audience and effectively takes us off the floor for a sequence of time.

Now, another couple, who I could see the whole time because I was facing into the middle of the floor - danced from 3/4 on the opposite side of the floor and, rather than change their movement, crashed fair into my partner. Not adjusting your movement after you have 3/4ers of the floor to do it is just plain rude, especially when we were not in anyone's way, so after the round finished, I went fair up to the guy and told him quietly to "keep the f*** away from my partner in the future". He apologised and that was that.

I've since used that tactic all of one, when another experienced and talented dancer decided to use his partner as a shield and, quite deliberately, slammed into my partner. Not on - I nearly hit him for that one.

2) When we're not in picture lines, I find it easy enough to swing around and drop my left arm so I am protecting my partner, and my elbow is sticking out. I find a lot of dancers suddenly develop some floorcraft when the alternative is a painful bruise, as I'm a tall, big 85-90kg guy and it's rare that I'm the one who's going to come off second best in a crash.

I must say, I never have a problem with other people's bad floorcraft, unless that means they hit my partner. I find that completely intollerable, because as far as I'm concerned, the man's job on the floor is to be a gentleman, and that means looking after every woman on the floor. If people want to crash into me, that's their problem.



But I do think every competition and social dancer should learn the basics about understanding how dancing flows (so they can predict where other dancers are going to go), and how to control themselves so they don't feel the need to barrel through everyone. Some competitions I really do get the feeling that I'm the only one not on an invisbile line that I must follow, regardless of what's in front of it.
Logged
SwingWaltz
Gold Star
***
Posts: 5772


« Reply #39 on: April 06, 2010, 10:48:39 PM »

2) When we're not in picture lines, I find it easy enough to swing around and drop my left arm so I am protecting my partner, and my elbow is sticking out. I find a lot of dancers suddenly develop some floorcraft when the alternative is a painful bruise, as I'm a tall, big 85-90kg guy and it's rare that I'm the one who's going to come off second best in a crash.

I must say, I never have a problem with other people's bad floorcraft, unless that means they hit my partner. I find that completely intollerable, because as far as I'm concerned, the man's job on the floor is to be a gentleman, and that means looking after every woman on the floor. If people want to crash into me, that's their problem.

I think floorcraft goes for everyone. Just cause you are bigger and stand your groud, doesn't mean who ever runs into you is at fault. I think smart floorcraft is both not running into people and avoid being ran into by other people. 
Logged
waltzelf
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 200


« Reply #40 on: April 06, 2010, 11:39:08 PM »

2) When we're not in picture lines, I find it easy enough to swing around and drop my left arm so I am protecting my partner, and my elbow is sticking out. I find a lot of dancers suddenly develop some floorcraft when the alternative is a painful bruise, as I'm a tall, big 85-90kg guy and it's rare that I'm the one who's going to come off second best in a crash.

I must say, I never have a problem with other people's bad floorcraft, unless that means they hit my partner. I find that completely intollerable, because as far as I'm concerned, the man's job on the floor is to be a gentleman, and that means looking after every woman on the floor. If people want to crash into me, that's their problem.

I think floorcraft goes for everyone. Just cause you are bigger and stand your groud, doesn't mean who ever runs into you is at fault. I think smart floorcraft is both not running into people and avoid being ran into by other people. 

I happily move out of people's way. Basic princplies of right of way apply on the dance floor, and as far as I'm concerned, if I can feel you behind me breathing down my neck, then yes, I'll stop and stand my ground - it's more dangerous for me and my partner if I continue dancing and potentially have someone crash into me from behind when I'm not properly balanced. The situation I described above was when I was scatterd chasseing around the side of the floor, and this couple was not only following my precise line, but catching up - and yes, from previous comps, I knew they were the kind of couple that would simply colide with us rather than calm things down or redirect their energy. Not on. It's up to the couple behind to understand what movement is going on in front of them, and behave accordingly.

As dancers, we can only be responsible for what it going on in front of us - and by that I mean what's happening further down our line of dance. If everyone plays by that rule, then the dancing flows around the floor properly.

Incidently, whether it's social dancing or competitive dancing, I have never, not once, crashed into another couple. I've been crashed into numerous times, but never the other way around. That tells me that there are other couples out there that do not take responsibility for their own floorcraft, and expect the better couples to dive left, right and centre out of their way. 

It's not floorcraft to act like a timid mouse on the floor, either. That just leads to terrible accidents. You make sure you won't hit couples in front of you, and you expect the couples behind you to have the same good judgement. When they don't then yes, you need to protect yourself.
Logged
TangoDancer
Open Bronze
*
Posts: 736



« Reply #41 on: April 07, 2010, 02:39:27 AM »

Being able to NOT have an accident/incedent is just as much a part of being a good dancer as learning the dances well.
Logged

The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #42 on: April 07, 2010, 06:36:09 AM »

Being able to NOT have an accident/incedent is just as much a part of being a good dancer as learning the dances well.

Judges often penalize dancers who colide carelessly.  But the trouble is for us that the large dancers are too often assumed to be at fault.  We had only one significant collision at our last competition - a short couple turned the corner facing backwards and ran straignt into us where we were standing after a turn - we were not moving - and they even fell on the floor, a mess of arms and legs (but did not hurt themselves thankfully).  After they apologized and said that their routine was crazy having to go backward with both of them facing the wrong way.

I talked to one of the judges (who is a regular at our comps) after the comp and she told me that my partner was too agressive on the floor.  Its true that at one time (2 yrs ago) he was but he has become very good at floor craft and avoiding hits since.  Since that was our only significant incident it seems she assumed it was our fault - and I think that size is a major factor.
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
QPO
Moderator
Continental Champion
****
Posts: 20824


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #43 on: April 07, 2010, 08:19:47 AM »

well I can sometimes forgive those on the social floor as they are learning but it is on the comp floor that I feel that it should be a skill that they teach beginners... Roll Eyes
Logged

Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
Lioness
Moderator
Open Gold
****
Posts: 4322



WWW
« Reply #44 on: April 07, 2010, 08:51:54 AM »

We had a couple of collisions today, one of which was our fault, one of which wasn't. The one that was, a couple in front of us randomly started dancing in the wrong direction (hello...LOD please?) and we didn't have enough time to avoid it. Still our fault, because we probably should've been a little further behind them. Second one, we were chasse waltzing along, in the middle ring, when a couple from the outer ring just come bombarding into the inner ring. We couldn't see them, because DP's back was to them, and I was looking to my left. They obviously didn't check whether the way was clean, and smashed into it. They left the floor after that, so I feel a little guilty, but we really couldn't have avoided it. 
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!