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Author Topic: Leading Issues  (Read 1068 times)
TangoDancer
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« on: September 18, 2009, 05:05:41 AM »

I thought this to be very important, so I reopened the issue from a closed thread. Cornutt was/is having lead questions. During the discussion, the subject of promenade came up, and there was reply of opening up or not to this position. The point....

I know the teacher who taught this; know of his reputation; disagree w/ much of what he says.  Huh Perhaps, we may discuss this thing of turning out into promenade b/c I spend a great deal of time teaching dancers to not. Thoughts?
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2009, 05:33:22 AM »

Sure - as long as it stays on point and DOES NOT REFER BACK TO THE OTHER TOPIC EXCEPT FOR DANCE CONTENT.  If it does this one goes down too, which would be a shame.  I for one was enjoying the (dance) story Smiley
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Some guy
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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2009, 10:36:44 AM »

I'm all ears... or in this case, "eyes", TD.
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cornutt
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2009, 05:35:19 PM »

I know the teacher who taught this; know of his reputation; disagree w/ much of what he says. 

Fair enough.  Actually, my instructor likes me to not turn out that much; maybe about 1/8th up top.  If I don't turn out at all, it feels... I don't know, claustrophobic.  I can't think of a better word.  A Latin frame in body contact, is the best analogy I can come up with.  Plus it's difficult for me to get my head turned properly; my neck won't quite rotate that far without strain. 

I've seen some couples who are completely closed up top, but have their hips way the heck turned out.  Besides the fact that my hips refuse to do that  Shocked, I think it looks affected.
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MusicChica
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Posts: 1325


« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2009, 06:08:43 PM »

The point I was trying to get at before was that, at least in our community, when people learn promenade, they turn out too much.  They plonk that foot down and turn out so much to the point where they're practically standing side-by-side with their partner instead of maintaining a connection towards their partner.  We're probably talking a 130-140 degree angle here.  So, to correct this (or prevent it from happening in the first place), pros here remind people to stay mostly closed to their partner and only open up as much as necessary to correctly execute the step.
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elisedance
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« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2009, 02:19:17 PM »

[Hey, we're doing pretty well here guys Cheesy]
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2009, 09:37:37 PM »

The point I was trying to get at before was that, at least in our community, when people learn promenade, they turn out too much.  They plonk that foot down and turn out so much to the point where they're practically standing side-by-side with their partner instead of maintaining a connection towards their partner.  We're probably talking a 130-140 degree angle here.  So, to correct this (or prevent it from happening in the first place), pros here remind people to stay mostly closed to their partner and only open up as much as necessary to correctly execute the step.

Yes, I totally understand what you are saying.

I will sometimes use “pill’ teaching. It is often used just before a competition/show as the couple/dancer will not be able to make big changes. I must say I don’t use “pill” teaching very much. If I have to then I make sure I tell the couple that it is a “pill” (temporary fix) and that we will need to work on it as soon as the comp/show is over. I have found that if I stick to teaching facts it is not often that the "pill" teaching is necessary.

DSV

« Last Edit: September 21, 2009, 09:40:01 PM by Dora-Satya Veda » Logged

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TangoDancer
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« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2009, 03:18:20 AM »

Fair enough.  Actually, my instructor likes me to not turn out that much; maybe about 1/8th up top.  If I don't turn out at all, it feels... I don't know, claustrophobic.  I can't think of a better word.  A Latin frame in body contact, is the best analogy I can come up with.  Plus it's difficult for me to get my head turned properly; my neck won't quite rotate that far without strain.  I've seen some couples who are completely closed up top, but have their hips way the heck turned out.  Besides the fact that my hips refuse to do that  Shocked, I think it looks affected.

Exactly, and Chica is expressing the same issue. Here are my thoughts, Cornutt. firstly, one must understand the 3 lines of promenade (you guys know this, yes?) Perhaps, I can figure out how to post a diagram to this forum. Briefly, for those whom might not; 1- from one's center, there is a line pointing straight toward the partner -the partner line, 2- at a right angle to this line (at approx 90*) one has another line -the direction line (sometimes called the promenade line), and from the center, draw a 3- third line pointing approx to the partners' elbow. This is called the dance line, or the execution line. It is simply where the feet go.

The lead for all promenade movements is for the man to, not turn out from the lady, but rotate the topline toward the lady, and step out ahead of her. This will rotate the lady toward the promenade direction, and allow her to follow behind the man's hip. The difficulty here for the guy is to dance ahead of the lady on the first step, but wait for her lead before the second step. this will solve your claustrophobia.

About the head; if it is in the correct position to begin with (not to sound belittling... that's not the intention), the above method will only increase the position outside of the topcircle offering you a great topline. Fortunate to have a manuscript, all of this stuff is in the, soon to be released (I'm told) "New Century Method of Ballroom Dance".

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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
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