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Author Topic: Stamina training - what do you do?  (Read 2682 times)
QPO
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« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2009, 12:29:22 AM »

well I think I should just do the steps from my QS I feel it all in the right places today.
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SwingWaltz
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« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2009, 04:14:19 AM »

QS runs across one side, scatter chasses across the opposite side, do it around the floor 4 times.
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2009, 03:06:50 PM »

Just dance 2 finals in a row or 10 dances with that you will be totally ready for your competitions.

DSV
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Edward Teller
SwingWaltz
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« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2009, 09:29:38 PM »

Just dance 2 finals in a row or 10 dances with that you will be totally ready for your competitions.

DSV

Haha we tried that on Saturday....I think we'll slowly build on it.  Roll Eyes
Our old training regime is nothing compare to what you told me.  Sad

Don't worry...we'll get there soon!
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2009, 11:08:41 PM »

Just dance 2 finals in a row or 10 dances with that you will be totally ready for your competitions.

DSV

Haha we tried that on Saturday....I think we'll slowly build on it.  Roll Eyes
Our old training regime is nothing compare to what you told me.  Sad

Don't worry...we'll get there soon!

Good, just keep working on it. I know you will soon be there. Remember to stay on schedule and keep a timer around to remind you.

DSV
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Edward Teller
QPO
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« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2009, 09:01:43 AM »

when the weather breaks I will start some cross training, now that we are doing more technuqie in our dancing we are not dancing the hours we did before in social...so have to pick up the huff and puff stuff another way.
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mamboqueen
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« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2009, 01:28:43 PM »

Hi....finally a few minutes to pop in and catch up a bit.

I have tried many things for stamina.  I am a classic "ectomorph" and I think that understanding your body type and its strengths and limitations is very helpful in setting a course of action for yourself in your training.  My body type is (according to what I have read about it, and it does seem to fit my body) more conducive to being flexible vs. muscular, and better suited for short spurts of speed (sprinter, not marathoner).  So what I try to do is compensate by working out the areas that I lack in:  strength and stamina for endurance.   In the past I have tried:  running, weights, yoga, stretching, as all part of my dance training, and general fitness regimen.  With running, I have found that doing interval training is probably the best conditioning for competitive dancer as it is closest to rounds (1.5 minutes high intensity, 30 seconds low...).  I also use a nylon "ladder", lay it out on the floor and run through it with my knees up *really* high.  I go forward, back, sideways and do a "serpentine" through it.  This is very helpful for jive. 

Secondary to physical training, but equally important, IMO, is diet.  And I don't mean diet as in "needs to lose weight".  I have been reading this book:  http://www.amazon.com/Thrive-Nutrition-Optimal-Performance-Sports/dp/0738212547 and trying to follow some of the author's suggestions.  I am not a vegan (not even a vegetarian), however, I do find that much of what the author writes makes sense in working your daily diet around your workouts.  He recommends that you have certain foods prior to workouts and certain things afterwards.  I have made many of the recipes in the book and bit by bit, am trying to interject them into my diet.  There is defintiely a big difference in how the body feels eating raw/unprocessed foods than eating cooked/processed foods.  There is no doubt about it.  It's just not entirely practical if you have a family to cook for, minimal budget or just don't care for raw and uncooked foods all the time.  In any event, I do recommend the book even if you are not a vegetarian/vegan.  I can't imagine giving up a good burger (and beer) on a hot summer day. 
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cornutt
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« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2009, 09:26:06 PM »

I would love to swim. love the water. I was afraid though if I do it to much or as a form of exercise that my back would be much larger.

is there truth in that?

I guess it depends on what stroke you do.  Backstroke is probably the worst for that, since you contract your back muscles to propel yourself.  Breaststroke doesn't use the back muscles much at all. 
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cornutt
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« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2009, 09:30:54 PM »

Hi....finally a few minutes to pop in and catch up a bit.

I am a classic "ectomorph" and I think that understanding your body type and its strengths and limitations is very helpful in setting a course of action for yourself in your training.  My body type is (according to what I have read about it, and it does seem to fit my body) more conducive to being flexible vs. muscular, and better suited for short spurts of speed (sprinter, not marathoner).  

Hi MQ!  This is interesting.  I'd always heard that long-fiber muscle, which lends to flexibility, is more efficient and better for stamina, while short-fiber (bulk, power) muscle is better for sprinting.  I'm pretty bulkly now, but when I was a teenager, I had no bulk and no power at all.  My sole asset as an athelete was my endurance, and in the sixth grade I could outrun anyone else in school in a distance run. 
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Medira
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« Reply #24 on: August 27, 2009, 11:00:51 AM »

I would love to swim. love the water. I was afraid though if I do it to much or as a form of exercise that my back would be much larger.

is there truth in that?
No moreso than if you were lifting weights or rowing or doing some other sort of exercise that engages the upper body and core.  I'm naturally a broader build across the ribcage and shoulders, but I don't think I look disproportionate even though I swim regularly.

As far as building stamina goes, I swim (obviously) and I take kickboxing classes.

Hi....finally a few minutes to pop in and catch up a bit.

<insert fantastic post here>

I can't imagine giving up a good burger (and beer) on a hot summer day. 

Hi MQ!  It's nice to see you. Smiley

I agree that knowledge about your body and how it works is essential for understanding what will work best for you when it comes to reaching your fitness goals.  In my case, I tend to lean toward being more muscular, though flexibility comes easily to me when I put some effort into it.

My sister is a kinesiology student and suggested that I might be interested in one of her books on Exercise Physiology because it focuses on physical performance, health and nutrition.  It was a very interesting read (especially because I didn't have the pressure of being tested on it Wink) and has a lot of good information.
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elisedance
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« Reply #25 on: August 31, 2009, 05:36:58 AM »

endurance training?  try to outrun both my DP and pro Wink  actually, its all the formal excerise I do.  I think if you can dance 10 hrs a week you probably are getting enough.  trouble is when one partner is off for a while...
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LucyDiamond
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« Reply #26 on: September 22, 2009, 01:32:39 PM »

When I get back from my vacation, I plan on taking up swimming laps. I'm seriously thinking about taking some swim lessons because I know I'm doing things incorrectly in the pool.
Update - I had my first swimming lesson on Friday and it was great. My teacher is a high school student who is on the local YMCA swim team. I told her that I took lessons as a child so know the strokes but my technique is lousy. She said she's excited about helping me with my technique.

We started off by her telling me how to kick properly and that they need to come from the hips and not the knees. WOW - what a difference that made. Also, I could really feel it in my legs, will be very good for them. She told me that it's ok for my kicks to be a little out of the water and that my rear end should also be a little out of the water. Again, what a difference that made. I can tell this proper position will really help my back and strengthen my core. Near the end of the lesson, she showed me the proper way to the arms when doing the crawl. That's the hardest part so far. This Friday we'll start talking about breathing properly.

I signed up for 5 private lessons and am sure I will learn enough in them to keep me going for quite awhile. I can see how all this will definately help my stamina.
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dancing1
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« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2009, 08:09:23 PM »

All the literature I can find on ectomorph says it is the ultimate marathoner.  I am an ectomorph and while I hate running,  I find that I do have more ability for endurance than speed.  I am a great believer in cross training for endurance, so I lift weights, do core training, and stationary bicycle at the gym.  We also do rounds practice - just five dances in a row, but up to 2 minutes each and only 10 minutes rest.  We do 3 rounds, but if you take a break from it or are not used to this kind of interval training, you do have to work up to it.  (tongue lolling out, pant, pant, pant)

Hi....finally a few minutes to pop in and catch up a bit.

I am a classic "ectomorph" and I think that understanding your body type and its strengths and limitations is very helpful in setting a course of action for yourself in your training.  My body type is (according to what I have read about it, and it does seem to fit my body) more conducive to being flexible vs. muscular, and better suited for short spurts of speed (sprinter, not marathoner).  

Hi MQ!  This is interesting.  I'd always heard that long-fiber muscle, which lends to flexibility, is more efficient and better for stamina, while short-fiber (bulk, power) muscle is better for sprinting.  I'm pretty bulkly now, but when I was a teenager, I had no bulk and no power at all.  My sole asset as an athelete was my endurance, and in the sixth grade I could outrun anyone else in school in a distance run. 

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albanaich
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« Reply #28 on: November 03, 2009, 12:54:36 PM »

There has been a long debate about this in the military, and their opinion is that best training for stamina is the sustained speed march or walk. Long distance running is probablly the worst way to improve stamina.

Long distance running teaches you to run slow, what you actually need in battle and in a dance competion is the ability to change pace, switching from the slower dances to the faster ones. It's a balance between long muscle and short muscle development. Running increases power and develops the short muscles, but, these muscles are quickly fatiqued. If your body is forced to use short muscles for steady pace ballroom dances they will be exhausted when it comes to doing Jive.

The aim should be to concentrate on the developing the long musciles - those use in fast walk or speed march - to manage the bulk of your competion dancing. The short muscles used in Jive and fast Latin are developed by sprinting.

The combat soldier has to march 25 miles into the battle, then sudden lift his pace to run like hell when he is shot at. If he's been running instead of walking/marching for 25 miles there's going to be nothing left to run with. Competiion dancing is much the same - the Jive is meant to kill of the competitors with exhaustion. However, with the right training regime it should be like breaking into a sprint after a brisk walk.





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elisedance
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« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2009, 01:07:29 PM »

There has been a long debate about this in the military, and their opinion is that best training for stamina is the sustained speed march or walk. Long distance running is probablly the worst way to improve stamina.

Long distance running teaches you to run slow, what you actually need in battle and in a dance competion is the ability to change pace, switching from the slower dances to the faster ones. It's a balance between long muscle and short muscle development. Running increases power and develops the short muscles, but, these muscles are quickly fatiqued. If your body is forced to use short muscles for steady pace ballroom dances they will be exhausted when it comes to doing Jive.

The aim should be to concentrate on the developing the long musciles - those use in fast walk or speed march - to manage the bulk of your competion dancing. The short muscles used in Jive and fast Latin are developed by sprinting.

The combat soldier has to march 25 miles into the battle, then sudden lift his pace to run like hell when he is shot at. If he's been running instead of walking/marching for 25 miles there's going to be nothing left to run with. Competiion dancing is much the same - the Jive is meant to kill of the competitors with exhaustion. However, with the right training regime it should be like breaking into a sprint after a brisk walk.

Interesting - except I think its the other way round with the muscles.  Marathon runners are sinnewy with long flexible muscles (aerobic by the way) where as sprinters have taught shorter, anaerobic muscles.  According to your idea above, a sport like squash or tennis should be good for dance training.

Interestingly ballroom (which I am more familiar with) has dances that demand both: vieneese waltz and foxtrot are classic sustained activity motions with few speed changes whereas tango is exactly teh opposite with QS and Waltz showing I suppose a bit of both (one tending to high activity and the other to changes).
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