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| | | |-+  'Ivan the terrible' or 'Fairy Godmonther' - which teacher works for you?
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Author Topic: 'Ivan the terrible' or 'Fairy Godmonther' - which teacher works for you?  (Read 2811 times)
elisedance
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« on: July 17, 2009, 06:23:23 AM »

This comes from a comment by catsmeow that he learns more by critism than complement.  Which style works better for you?
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2009, 06:57:59 AM »

I am not really sure what I like the best. I guess somewhere in between. All my teachers in England were tough with me. I would sometimes see my teachers with other students and they were sooo nice to them. This would sometimes make me a little upset but once my lesson started, then I was too busy to feel the self-pity.

The biggest compliment that I ever got from my main teacher was "that looks normal" and that only happened about three times in the 8 years that I worked with him. He would say "that’s better" as an encouragement very often. He told me, when I started teaching that it was more important to telling the student what to do, then telling the student what not to do. He also told me to use "that’s better" often. I must say, I think I am very similar to my main teacher. My students don't hear a lot or big compliments often but when they do, they know they did really well.

Actually, it might be better if my students wrote what they think.

Dora-Satya Veda

PS. To my students.....I am not going to get upset when and/or if you tell the truth.
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« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2009, 07:26:50 AM »

I have to say I respond better to my current instructor, who uses "that's better" rather than the "no, that's not right, do it again" approach.  I always leave the lesson thinking that I made progress, even if it is just a little.

The lessons at which I am most unhappy are the ones where I don't feel as though I progressed.

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emeralddancer
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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2009, 09:13:25 AM »

I like my "Ivan the Terrible". But that is because I like the truth.

What I do not like is the OVER exaggeration of my mistakes. (I do not see other instructors do this)

There is a point in teaching honestly and brutally with out humiliating a person.

I know I do not need compliments. I do however need and idea if I am progressing or not.

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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2009, 09:31:54 AM »

I would like something in between, I don't like an instructor that can only come up with a nasty tone it would not get the best out of me. But I don't want anyone telling me how wonderful I am when I am not.

There needs to be good blend. One teacher says you will never hear me say you do it perfect because there will always be something to improve, which is fair enough. But I dont think I would enjoy a teacher that barked at me the whole lesson, I can do that to myself. Roll Eyes
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« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2009, 09:56:06 AM »

I like a mix.  Someone who is encouraging, but doesn't tell me I'm wonderful.  That being said, I do need a bit of praise once in awhile, just so that I feel as though I'm accomplishing something.
Apparently, in my former studio, I was the only student who would spend an entire lesson working on one thing over and over with no moving on to another concept because that is how my instructor taught me and only me.  I was surprised to learn that other students worked on different dances during their lessons.  So, while that instructor was not cruel, he was very driven and a perfectionist, which was flattering, because he thought I could do it, but frustrating because I never felt as though I did anything right.
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cornutt
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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2009, 11:51:22 AM »

If I were an aspiring pro, I wouldn't mind an instructor who got in my face sometimes, as a motivational tool.  But as it is, I have people in my face all day at work; I don't need more of it when I go to the studio.  Not to say that my instructor doesn't point out my mistakes.  But she takes more of the engineer's approach to it -- "this is what needs to be fixed, so let's figure out how to fix it." 

(She actually tolerates something from me that would probably drive most instructors crazy: After we've fixed something, I often insist on doing root cause analysis on the bit that I was doing wrong.  "Why have I been doing it that way?"  Especially since there is sometimes no obvious answer.  But that's the way my mind works.)
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MusicChica
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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2009, 12:35:48 PM »

If I were an aspiring pro, I wouldn't mind an instructor who got in my face sometimes, as a motivational tool.  But as it is, I have people in my face all day at work; I don't need more of it when I go to the studio.  Not to say that my instructor doesn't point out my mistakes.  But she takes more of the engineer's approach to it -- "this is what needs to be fixed, so let's figure out how to fix it." 

(She actually tolerates something from me that would probably drive most instructors crazy: After we've fixed something, I often insist on doing root cause analysis on the bit that I was doing wrong.  "Why have I been doing it that way?"  Especially since there is sometimes no obvious answer.  But that's the way my mind works.)


I don't think your pro has it in her to get up in your face like that!  She's like the sweetest woman alive...
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elisedance
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« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2009, 12:58:13 PM »

If its a choice gimme ItT.  Having him stop correcting something and go onto a bigger issue is enough reassurement for me that I'm getting somewhere. 

However, what I do like to hear is that HE enjoyed dancing something - thats the absolute best compliment a girl can get.....
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cornutt
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« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2009, 12:59:27 PM »



I don't think your pro has it in her to get up in your face like that!  She's like the sweetest woman alive...

Yep!   Wink  She is an extraordinary lady, with darn near infinite patience.  
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Rugby
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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2009, 05:41:48 PM »

I have worked with instructors from one extrme to another.  I've gotten used to them all but I guess I would chose someone in between.  I have seen hard instructors turn students off so they walk away but I have seen some so soft that the students never progress that much and thus they walk away too. 

We have one female istandard nstructor that can be very rough on the ego.  Two lessons ago she was pretty good to us but when she said it was a pleasure to teach you I laughed because I thought she was making a joke.  She got quite peeved and told us she does not say it if she does not mean it and there has been damn few she has ever said it to.  Our next lesson she told us the same thing and though she has been quite rough at times I knew that meant my DP and I, at least in her eyes, were truly starting to dance well together.  From her that was more of a compliment than if it came from anyone else. 
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elisedance
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« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2009, 06:11:38 PM »

IMO theres nothing worse than a teacher that tells you everything is fine - because if everything is fine why am I not world champion?  This is much worse than the one who says everything is awful because, at least that one is correct Wink (though one may need self esteem as high as Cassius Clay to survive it Smiley)
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
waltzelf
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« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2009, 11:22:03 PM »

I need a teacher who is hard on me through the course of the lesson - but supportive at other times. I don't need a compliment to feel the approval or respect of my teacher.
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Ginger
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I see what you did there.


« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2009, 11:34:07 PM »

I just want a teacher who will teach, instead of air out inter-studio politics from THEIR past which they expect us to inherit. When she's on, she's on, and it's great. When she's off though... yeesh.

You can get the point across without being Smaug.
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Bordertangoman
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« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2009, 07:26:58 AM »

IMO theres nothing worse than a teacher that tells you everything is fine - because if everything is fine why am I not world champion?  This is much worse than the one who says everything is awful because, at least that one is correct Wink (though one may need self esteem as high as Cassius Clay to survive it Smiley)

it depends on your motivation and your strength of character. If your profession is to become a dancer and you are learning full time you will need someone who drives you to your limits and beyond. If you are going to learn something for the pleasure of it or a hobby; you dont want a harpy screaming at you that your posture sucks. It also depends on if its one to one or a group.

Being honest is not the same as screaming at someone; if you shout at someone their defences go up ( thats why martial artists shout at their enemies causing them to freeze!) No doubt military training is create endurance in the face of adversity but I can get better results when people are relaxed and laughing.

A good teacher judges what you are ready for.
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