partnerdanceonline.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 31, 2014, 12:53:53 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
A lot of people are visiting Smiley Smiley
Undecided Undecided but not many are posting....
please say hi Cheesy
116470 Posts in 1856 Topics by 221 Members
Latest Member: EVE_Dance
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  partnerdanceonline.com
|-+  Partner Dancing
| |-+  Partner Dances
| | |-+  General partner dance issues (Moderators: Rugby, cornutt)
| | | |-+  Hitting the wall
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 Print
Author Topic: Hitting the wall  (Read 5332 times)
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #15 on: July 07, 2009, 05:41:39 AM »

don't be afraid to say to your teacher that you want a change. technique can be very boring. so when things like "hitting the wall" happened, ask your teacher if he/she can just "spin you a round". forget about a control, balance, technique ....... ask him/her if he/she can put your favorite music and just dance.  Wink 

I would totally agree with this statement. I would rather you tell me that you "hit a wall" then you just getting more and more frustrated. I like to create games and alternative ways to learn things. I often have students do things that are different as I can see they are not getting what I am trying to get through to them. My teacher always said that the job of a teacher is to find ways the student learns. Sometimes playing games is the only way to go. So speak up and let your teacher know that you appreciate the information but you need to hear and experience something different to be able to look at it again with a fresh and open mind.
Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #16 on: July 07, 2009, 07:20:30 AM »

I have a lousy memory so end up trying a new way because for me its easier than remembering the old one.  If you do things from scratch everytime its more work but you often find better ways.

Now that is hard in dancing because there is the attitude that everything has been discovered and you just have to find the person to learn it from.  That may be true for much but I am sure its not true for all..
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
cornutt
Administrator
Silver
****
Posts: 1845


« Reply #17 on: July 07, 2009, 09:41:03 AM »

I just saw this and thought its great advice and needs to be repeated.  Its also the bane of pro/am - you get lessons but too often you just don't get to dance - the time is too precious and I think that really affects how you look at a competition.

I know what you mean; dancing with my instructor is ridiculously easy, but there are still times when I wish we could practice together more.  Being a co-owner of the studio, she's usually busy on Friday night and doesn't get to dance much, plus I feel somewhat obligated to yield to her less experienced students when she is available.  Sometimes, I start a lesson with, "Can we just put some music on and go around the floor a couple of times first?"
Logged
malakawa
Open Bronze
*
Posts: 830



« Reply #18 on: July 07, 2009, 01:40:20 PM »

don't be afraid to say to your teacher that you want a change. technique can be very boring. so when things like "hitting the wall" happened, ask your teacher if he/she can just "spin you a round". forget about a control, balance, technique ....... ask him/her if he/she can put your favorite music and just dance.  Wink 

I would totally agree with this statement. I would rather you tell me that you "hit a wall" then you just getting more and more frustrated. I like to create games and alternative ways to learn things. I often have students do things that are different as I can see they are not getting what I am trying to get through to them. My teacher always said that the job of a teacher is to find ways the student learns. Sometimes playing games is the only way to go. So speak up and let your teacher know that you appreciate the information but you need to hear and experience something different to be able to look at it again with a fresh and open mind.

when you realize what you've said - than you know that you are on the way to become a great teacher.   Wink (and we had a lot of same teachers)  Wink
Logged

Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, but she did it backwards and in high heels.

It takes an athlete to dance, but an artist to be a dancer.
MusicChica
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1325


« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2009, 05:24:28 PM »

Well, I found the motivation I needed for my comp in a couple weeks--I get to kick X's tuchus in the showdance (he wasn't sure if he'd be able to compete or not, but it turns out he can).  We originally challenged each other back in January because he couldn't compete at the comp then, and at that point it was just friendly and funny.  It's not funny anymore; not after he treated me the way he did.  My technique is markedly better than his, so if the judges are mesmerized by the fact that he can do fancy lifts and I can't and he beats me, I swear I'll spit nails.
Logged
Some guy
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1464


« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2009, 06:00:47 PM »

MC, if I'm reading your message right, the only variable that will determine victory of nail spitting is the judge.  I know there are several judges on this site, and I wish either they, or similar judges, could be there to judge this event (as the few I know on PDO place a heavy emphasis on a strong foundation over tricks) but if you are not lucky enough to get judges like that you're going to be very disappointed.  The only variable here appears to be the judge.  You have no control of that.  MusicaChica, it's great that you're competitive, but basing your happiness on something you have no control of, someone else's opinion, in this case, that of a judge, is a recipe for disaster (as I have learned all too painfully). 

It might be better to base your happiness on your own opinion of your dancing.  Judging by your comparison of your technique to that of the other guy you're competing with, it looks like you've already won!   Wink
Logged
skipper
Bronze
*
Posts: 376


« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2009, 02:05:16 PM »

I agree with SG.
The satisfaction needs to come from within.
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #22 on: July 11, 2009, 02:38:38 PM »

I think we all agree - in theory but if that was the case why compete?  There is something more to not only dancing better but being recognized for it.  Imagine that you were twice as good as another couple (as might be assessed by the best judges in the world) but that in your local competition environment for whatever reason you were always judged second to them.  If you were a saint you might be satisfied by the knowledge that you dance better but few of us are and eventually anger, frustration and sometimes bitterness will set in - with a strong likelihood of at some point giving up competing entirely.

Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Some guy
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1464


« Reply #23 on: July 11, 2009, 03:03:32 PM »

I agree Elise.  I speak from experience.  Bitterness and feeling sorry for myself never improved my dancing.  It actually made me lose lots of precious time.  My coach started to make me think of each loss as merely "a result" of my current course of action.  Not a "bad result", just "a result".  I believe that's a productive, very neutral, and objective way to think about it.  Thinking of it as merely a result, therefore requiring a course correction, is a lot easier than thinking of it as a personal "loss" or "failure".  That way each "loss" only makes you stronger and better, and in my local experience, enables you to improve much faster than the competitors you lost to. 
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 03:21:58 PM by Some guy » Logged
MusicChica
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1325


« Reply #24 on: July 11, 2009, 03:19:01 PM »

Thank you, ee.

And you're right, SG--it all comes down to the judges.  Believe me, it takes a lot for me to say that about my own dancing.  Anybody that knows me (including several people here on the forum) knows that I'm my own worst critic, but even I have to admit that I'm a stronger technical dancer than X is.  So I'm sorry, but it's just not fair to penalize me for not being able to do the same fancy tricks that he can.

And in this case, it's also a huge function of who I'm competing against.  This was a friendly challenge at first, and in fact most of the people we'll both be competing against are from our own studio and thus there's a big element of friendly competition going on--but this particular rivalry has stopped being friendly.  As I told a good friend of mine a couple days ago (who I'll actually also be competing against), I honestly don't care if I don't come in first, if somebody else beats me--just so long as I beat X.
Logged
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #25 on: July 11, 2009, 09:16:46 PM »

I just wanted to comment a little to the judging issue.

The result of any competition does come down to the judges, but never, never give your power away to the judges.

Let’s just look at this from a judge’s point of view. I have many times seen a couple/dancer walk on the floor defeated even before they start dancing. This makes it difficult for the judge to look at this couple/dancer with a positive expectation for the dancing that is to come. We are only human, if you don’t like your dancing, then why should we. We do not have a long time to evaluate your performance so the harder you make it for the judge to judge you, the less likely you are in getting a good result. Make it easy for the judge to evaluate your performance and you are most likely to do well.

Let me just give this advice. You can only present what you know and do now. What you are going to have/do a week, a month or a year down the road really doesn’t matter. My teacher used to say “You can only sell what is in stock and what’s on the shelves now”. You need to find one subject for every competition that you go in there to present. If you do that then you will have a change to be and feel successful.

Please do not give your power away to a few people standing there with a pen. Don’t let them put a value on your whole being. If you are hard on yourself it might be because you are unconsciously addicted to emotions. Look at the movie “what the blip do we know” and look at the addiction part. Ask yourself if you are addicted or this is just a fluke.

If you show a love and appreciation of self, then judges are going to pick that up and it will be easy to give your dancing a fair evaluation.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Dora-Satya Veda
Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
MusicChica
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1325


« Reply #26 on: July 12, 2009, 02:18:53 AM »

unconsciously addicted to emotions

Now that's an interesting concept--care to elaborate?

And let me ask you something--how can you tell when somebody walks onto the floor defeated?

As for the judges thing, I'm less inclined to "give my power away to the judges" as you said, but with this guy it's all about the results.  It won't matter if I actually outdance him, if he beats me he won't let me forget it.
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #27 on: July 12, 2009, 03:39:38 AM »

Then you are letting him take control.  If you asked him the same question - is beating you the main reason he is on the floor he would probably say no, he does not consider you a significant challenge.  And there's where the winner and the loser revolve in many competitions - guy A goes out to beat the champion, the champion goes out to perform - and the champion wins because guy A has subscribed to the idea that his goal is not to win but to beat the champion.

Real champions have only themselves to compete against - doing better than their last time out - its a mentality that comes accross to anyone watching.  Its not that champions never get beaten but it takes a considerable event for it to happen.
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
MusicChica
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1325


« Reply #28 on: July 12, 2009, 03:54:54 AM »

I don't know what y'all want me to say here.  My attitude about this isn't really going to change.  I don't want this to be the deathmatch that it's turning into, believe me I'd much rather have that attitude y'all are talking about--and for the single dances and scholarship I do--but this showdance thing is just not the friendly banter between us that it used to be.  Literally, if he beats me, the subject will NEVER.DIE., and that's just not something I want to have to deal with for all that time.
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #29 on: July 12, 2009, 04:13:30 AM »

I see - we are making too much of it, but its an easy mistake to make.  If its a friendly rivalry then thats all it is, I think we are translating it into a competition floor death match!  Still, there's much to be learned in how to deal with that too so even if it is not relevant to you directly, its useful for others Wink
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!