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Author Topic: "dancing is walking"  (Read 3308 times)
elisedance
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ee


« on: June 20, 2009, 04:20:34 AM »

A phrase that you read a lot - as I understand it, it really means that dancing should be as easy - as efficient - as walking so if you find you are putting a lot of work into dancing then you may not be doing it the optimum way. 

However, there is a lot more to this that needs figuring out.  There is, for example, the conundrum: I really only have one way of walking (optimally) - so how can the character of the dances be so different? 

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Ginger
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I see what you did there.


« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2009, 12:14:54 PM »

I walk like Sasquatch, so perhaps this analogy is inapplicable to myself.
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elisedance
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« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2009, 06:06:40 PM »

Cheesy
I have absolutely no answer to that....
except perhaps you should walk like you dance Roll Eyes
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QPO
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« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2009, 08:59:32 PM »

yes I hear that dancing is no more than fancy walking..but I struggle to image people walking down the street doing a foxtrot  Shocked but I understand the concept.
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emeralddancer
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« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2009, 02:41:40 AM »

well .... I agree to I am struggling.

Because like in Waltz there is a softening of the knees and a deliberate rise and lower. Now I guess you can say it is like walking insofar you must soften the knees. But the rise and lower based on the waltz steps do not coincide with walking.

then tango ... it is with bent knees no rise and lower or if there is , more of allusion then? and if so how to equate to walking?

with foxtrot I can the similarities except for the rise on 3. (and well heel turns)

quickstep for me is more running than anything

V. Waltz ... do not know.
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QPO
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2009, 09:54:31 AM »

yes. I think out of all the dancing foxtrot is the most walking dance out of all of them...it is a very general statement but it helps those perhaps that may get overwhlemed with the thought of dancing.
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SwingWaltz
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2009, 10:49:41 AM »



so how can the character of the dances be so different? 



Music and musical expression!
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elisedance
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« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2009, 01:58:38 PM »



so how can the character of the dances be so different? 



Music and musical expression!
and only that? 
not so sure...
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Some guy
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« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2009, 03:59:43 PM »

I tend to agree with SwingWatlz. 

To me, it's the music and expression that determines how to change our walking.  I had a coach once long time ago who tried to teach me this.  Unfortunately it was a visiting coach (who stopped visiting) because my main coach (closed minded as he is) rejected the idea the visiting coach was trying to instill in me: dancing is walking, not rocket science.  I was too "polluted" with all the instruction I had received at the time from my regular coach to be able to open my mind and try to understand what that visiting coach was telling me. 

That visiting coach played all five Standard dances on the stereo and had me walk to the music.  Nothing fancy, just walk in "athletic position" (another notion that my regular coach at the time banished).  Then he wanted me to "interpret" the music as I walked (which I have now come to learn as the "swing-set" feeling that DSV mentioned in another thread).  By "interpret", he wanted me to get "swept up" by the music.  This was key because this determines how much drive you'll subconsciously inject into your steps, how much and when you'll rise and fall, etc.  He made me do this with my eyes closed on an empty ballroom.  Try this some time and tell me what you feel.  You don't have to keep your eyes closed if you can focus on the music and the music alone.  You might surprise yourself.  The Waltz felt the strangest at the time because count "1" seemed to be the strongest when I got swept up in the music.  So before hitting count "1", it felt natural to "drive" on to count 1 and glide through counts 2 and 3.  My regular coach at the time made me believe that count "2" had to be the strongest.  So dancing strong onto count "1" felt "weird" at the time.   

The Tango was the most interesting: there was nothing I could do than to haul my "asset" across the dance floor - the musical interpration did not allow any sway or rise and fall.  Foxtrot was interesting because he wanted me to walk 3 steps (Slow Quick Quick) to the 4-count music.  Viennese Waltz felt the worst at the time because my technical "baggage" I was carrying around never allowed me to truly let my body get swept up in the music.  Now when I hear it at a competition, I let the music do all the work!  I just get swept up in it. 

Unfortunately my regular coach at the time thought that the visiting coach was crazy and stopped bringing him to our studio.  Today I realize what the coach was trying to accomplish.  He used to be a Canadian champion by the way. 

« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 04:04:03 PM by Some guy » Logged
Beachbum
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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2009, 05:10:27 PM »

If dancing is walking, every step should use CBM.  Think about it.
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Yes.  Quite.
elisedance
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« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2009, 06:48:30 PM »

hi there  BB, haven't seen you for a while, not walkin' past these parts Wink Smiley
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QPO
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« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2009, 08:39:09 PM »

If dancing is walking, every step should use CBM.  Think about it.


so then we would be crabs! Shocked
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2009, 03:04:54 AM »

I tend to agree with SwingWatlz. 

To me, it's the music and expression that determines how to change our walking.  I had a coach once long time ago who tried to teach me this.  Unfortunately it was a visiting coach (who stopped visiting) because my main coach (closed minded as he is) rejected the idea the visiting coach was trying to instill in me: dancing is walking, not rocket science.  I was too "polluted" with all the instruction I had received at the time from my regular coach to be able to open my mind and try to understand what that visiting coach was telling me. 

That visiting coach played all five Standard dances on the stereo and had me walk to the music.  Nothing fancy, just walk in "athletic position" (another notion that my regular coach at the time banished).  Then he wanted me to "interpret" the music as I walked (which I have now come to learn as the "swing-set" feeling that DSV mentioned in another thread).  By "interpret", he wanted me to get "swept up" by the music.  This was key because this determines how much drive you'll subconsciously inject into your steps, how much and when you'll rise and fall, etc.  He made me do this with my eyes closed on an empty ballroom.  Try this some time and tell me what you feel.  You don't have to keep your eyes closed if you can focus on the music and the music alone.  You might surprise yourself.  The Waltz felt the strangest at the time because count "1" seemed to be the strongest when I got swept up in the music.  So before hitting count "1", it felt natural to "drive" on to count 1 and glide through counts 2 and 3.  My regular coach at the time made me believe that count "2" had to be the strongest.  So dancing strong onto count "1" felt "weird" at the time.   

The Tango was the most interesting: there was nothing I could do than to haul my "asset" across the dance floor - the musical interpration did not allow any sway or rise and fall.  Foxtrot was interesting because he wanted me to walk 3 steps (Slow Quick Quick) to the 4-count music.  Viennese Waltz felt the worst at the time because my technical "baggage" I was carrying around never allowed me to truly let my body get swept up in the music.  Now when I hear it at a competition, I let the music do all the work!  I just get swept up in it. 

Unfortunately my regular coach at the time thought that the visiting coach was crazy and stopped bringing him to our studio.  Today I realize what the coach was trying to accomplish.  He used to be a Canadian champion by the way. 

What I teach, "verbatim". On a small note, I only do not use the word drive when discussing the 1 in Waltz, opting to use 'swing' b/c I get a more natural fluidity of movement through the 2, rather than a physical push into the 1 which results in problems w/ 2 and, sometimes 3.
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2009, 03:12:32 AM »

If dancing is walking, every step should use CBM.  Think about it.


so then we would be crabs! Shocked

Grin Grin Grin
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

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elisedance
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Blackpool Finalist
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Posts: 34896


ee


« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2009, 03:15:27 AM »

I tend to agree with SwingWatlz. 

To me, it's the music and expression that determines how to change our walking.  I had a coach once long time ago who tried to teach me this.  Unfortunately it was a visiting coach (who stopped visiting) because my main coach (closed minded as he is) rejected the idea the visiting coach was trying to instill in me: dancing is walking, not rocket science.  I was too "polluted" with all the instruction I had received at the time from my regular coach to be able to open my mind and try to understand what that visiting coach was telling me. 

That visiting coach played all five Standard dances on the stereo and had me walk to the music.  Nothing fancy, just walk in "athletic position" (another notion that my regular coach at the time banished).  Then he wanted me to "interpret" the music as I walked (which I have now come to learn as the "swing-set" feeling that DSV mentioned in another thread).  By "interpret", he wanted me to get "swept up" by the music.  This was key because this determines how much drive you'll subconsciously inject into your steps, how much and when you'll rise and fall, etc.  He made me do this with my eyes closed on an empty ballroom.  Try this some time and tell me what you feel.  You don't have to keep your eyes closed if you can focus on the music and the music alone.  You might surprise yourself.  The Waltz felt the strangest at the time because count "1" seemed to be the strongest when I got swept up in the music.  So before hitting count "1", it felt natural to "drive" on to count 1 and glide through counts 2 and 3.  My regular coach at the time made me believe that count "2" had to be the strongest.  So dancing strong onto count "1" felt "weird" at the time.   

The Tango was the most interesting: there was nothing I could do than to haul my "asset" across the dance floor - the musical interpration did not allow any sway or rise and fall.  Foxtrot was interesting because he wanted me to walk 3 steps (Slow Quick Quick) to the 4-count music.  Viennese Waltz felt the worst at the time because my technical "baggage" I was carrying around never allowed me to truly let my body get swept up in the music.  Now when I hear it at a competition, I let the music do all the work!  I just get swept up in it. 

Unfortunately my regular coach at the time thought that the visiting coach was crazy and stopped bringing him to our studio.  Today I realize what the coach was trying to accomplish.  He used to be a Canadian champion by the way. 



thats terrific SG - you should think of becoming a coach yourself, its obvious that you have both the perception and the communication skills - and no, you don't have to be a national champion Wink

Who was the visiting coach?  I don't think there are any privacy issues to not share a compliment Wink  Besides, I would love to know who - and guess that it was a he and the initials were PA...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
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