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Author Topic: Read any good books lately?  (Read 9958 times)
elisedance
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« Reply #60 on: November 15, 2010, 10:54:07 PM »

The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor

Hilarious and deep novel about a freakishly gifted bear who plays alto sax, lives in New York and his continuing misadventures in the pursuit of truth, beauty, art, perfection and love.

Any bear into that is a bear for me... or I would be a bear for.. oh, never mind...
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Bordertangoman
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« Reply #61 on: November 16, 2010, 04:02:03 AM »

The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor

Hilarious and deep novel about a freakishly gifted bear who plays alto sax, lives in New York and his continuing misadventures in the pursuit of truth, beauty, art, perfection and love.

that aounds good. I'm reading Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom by Rick Hanson and Richard Mendius
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”We need a witness to our lives.  There's a billion people on the planet, what does any one life really mean? But in a marriage, you're promising to care about everything.  The good things, the bad things, the terrible things, the mundane things, all of it, all of the time, every day. "
QPO
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« Reply #62 on: November 26, 2010, 08:40:50 PM »

I never get to read ooks, I just dont have the time, Ihardly sit still for more than 10 minutes and my experience with reading is it is all or nothing Tongue
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CANI
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« Reply #63 on: January 17, 2011, 09:07:25 PM »

The Courage to be Free by Finley.  It isn't that it is such a great book, quite average, but it has a wonderful story at the beginning of eagles walking -- it has been on my mind ever since and shifted how I've looked at a number think in my life.  So, I'm glad I read it.  It is a very short book -- less than 100 pages.
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chachacat
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« Reply #64 on: February 22, 2011, 03:48:12 PM »

I  just read Cheryl Burke's book, "Dancing Lessons."  Interesting!
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elisedance
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« Reply #65 on: February 22, 2011, 06:04:53 PM »

I  just read Cheryl Burke's book, "Dancing Lessons."  Interesting!

hi there CCC - any gems to share?
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Bordertangoman
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« Reply #66 on: February 23, 2011, 04:13:51 AM »

I never get to read ooks, I just dont have the time, Ihardly sit still for more than 10 minutes and my experience with reading is it is all or nothing Tongue

ooks? you are familiar with the Librarian at the Unseen University

On discovering that being an orang-utan had certain advantages for a librarian - he can climb up to high shelves, for example - he refused to be transformed back into a human and has remained an orang-utan ever since. The other wizards have gradually become used to the situation, to the extent that,: ‘if someone ever reported that there was an orang-utan in the Library, the wizards would probably go and ask the Librarian if he'd seen it.’

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”We need a witness to our lives.  There's a billion people on the planet, what does any one life really mean? But in a marriage, you're promising to care about everything.  The good things, the bad things, the terrible things, the mundane things, all of it, all of the time, every day. "
elisedance
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« Reply #67 on: February 23, 2011, 06:21:02 AM »

I never get to read ooks, I just dont have the time, Ihardly sit still for more than 10 minutes and my experience with reading is it is all or nothing Tongue

ooks? you are familiar with the Librarian at the Unseen University

On discovering that being an orang-utan had certain advantages for a librarian - he can climb up to high shelves, for example - he refused to be transformed back into a human and has remained an orang-utan ever since. The other wizards have gradually become used to the situation, to the extent that,: ‘if someone ever reported that there was an orang-utan in the Library, the wizards would probably go and ask the Librarian if he'd seen it.’


Grin
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Bordertangoman
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« Reply #68 on: February 23, 2011, 07:25:45 AM »

Now i am absoltuley sure I have read several books recently and they were probably good, although one was average....

Oliver Rackham's "Trees And Woodland In The British Landscape "

is essential for any dendrologist, amatuer of professional
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”We need a witness to our lives.  There's a billion people on the planet, what does any one life really mean? But in a marriage, you're promising to care about everything.  The good things, the bad things, the terrible things, the mundane things, all of it, all of the time, every day. "
elisedance
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« Reply #69 on: February 23, 2011, 09:42:08 AM »

Now i am absoltuley sure I have read several books recently and they were probably good, although one was average....

Oliver Rackham's "Trees And Woodland In The British Landscape "

is essential for any dendrologist, amatuer of professional

NY times book review:
"excellent prose and imagery - but the plot is a bit lacking..."
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Bordertangoman
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« Reply #70 on: February 23, 2011, 10:29:29 AM »

Now i am absoltuley sure I have read several books recently and they were probably good, although one was average....

Oliver Rackham's "Trees And Woodland In The British Landscape "

is essential for any dendrologist, amatuer of professional

NY times book review:
"excellent prose and imagery - but the plot is a bit lacking..."

oh, that's hardly fair; he deals with the  vagaries of medieavel England, the Domesday book, the woodland orign of place names, the presence and absnece of Ancient Woodland indicators, the birth of the Forestry Commission. He is a master of decution; for instance the presence of thousanand oxlip flowers can signy a presence of an ancient woodlnad and many plant seed or lie dormant in heavy shade until the trees are felled or coppiced then grow again, pannage ( i think) where pigs grazed on woodland; the advent of the Deer Park, how woods can reveal ancient field boundary mounds ( because they havnt been ploughed under). Not to mention Denrochronolgy
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”We need a witness to our lives.  There's a billion people on the planet, what does any one life really mean? But in a marriage, you're promising to care about everything.  The good things, the bad things, the terrible things, the mundane things, all of it, all of the time, every day. "
elisedance
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« Reply #71 on: February 23, 2011, 10:31:49 AM »

Sounds absolutely fantastic - indeed, I'd love to read it.  However, my review snip was for the english literature column...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Bordertangoman
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« Reply #72 on: February 28, 2011, 05:42:17 AM »

I am reading "Out Stealing Horses" bt Per Petterson..

This fine novel, translated from the Norwegian by Anne Born, was the surprise winner of the 2006 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and it really is a book to cherish and remember.

Out Stealing Horses eschews the knowing realism of much contemporary fiction in favour of the episodic ebb and flow of the "unending conversation" in the mind of the narrator, as he looks back upon a series of traumatic war-time incidents in the past, and in the face of approaching old age. The narrator, Trond, has returned, following the death of his second wife, to a remote settlement in Norway where he and his family spent their childhood holidays under German occupation. Not only do old faces re-appear, but he has to try to finally understand the familial and political betrayals of that bitter period of resistance and collaboration, and the breaking of families.

The detail of the daily round of wood-chopping, shopping, cooking, dog-walking and immersion in the life of the forest of an ageing widower is beautifully achieved. There is also the occasional drink with a neighbour, and a nightly reading of Dickens, the novelist whose work shaped the imagination of the young Norwegian who, like David Copperfield, desperately hoped to become the hero of his own life. That question overshadows the whole novel: did he achieve this heroic role?

Tragedy and epiphany recur in equal parts, though the deep forest interiors seem to absorb all of human hope and suffering. In his childhood Trond remembers the milkmaids singing the cows home every evening just as vividly as the presence of the Germans and the secretive night-time manoeuvres of local partisans. However, there was one terrible incident involving the accidental shooting of a child by its twin brother, that provides the fulcrum of the novel, and seems to instigate a pattern of family ruptures that marks the lives of nearly all of the male characters we meet. The narrator, like his father before him, and his best friend, at some point in his life walks out on his family, never to return or even maintain contact. Going missing seems to be the price men under stress have to pay in these taciturn, unforgiving times and places.


Ken Worpole
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”We need a witness to our lives.  There's a billion people on the planet, what does any one life really mean? But in a marriage, you're promising to care about everything.  The good things, the bad things, the terrible things, the mundane things, all of it, all of the time, every day. "
Bordertangoman
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« Reply #73 on: February 28, 2011, 05:47:36 AM »

and about to embark on " The Reindeer People" by Piers Vitebsky
it is partly a memoir, a travelogue, an anthropological study

In northeast Siberia, temperatures can drop to 96 degrees below zero. Boiling water flung from a teacup will freeze before reaching the ground. In these unimaginable conditions, the Eveny nomads have lived and thrived for thousands of years. Vitebsky, who teaches anthropology and Russian studies at Cambridge University, has spent much of the last 20 years among these people and their herds of reindeer. No dry anthropological study, his story teems with strong personalities, perilous adventures and time-honored folkways. Wearing thick reindeer coats and boots, Vitebsky accompanies the tribesmen across Siberia seeking small animals to trap and sell. He meets hunters who live alone for a year at a time, Russian bureaucrats whose only concern is making quotas set by their comrades in Moscow, and the extended families whose ties bind them through month-long blizzards and the simple stuff of daily life. At the story's center are the reindeer, providing meat, clothing and income. While the Eveny's ancestors followed the reindeer, migrating from Upper Mongolia to northern Siberia, present-day Eveny now tame, cultivate and survive with them in almost perfect balance. With grace, courage and sensitivity, Vitebsky reveals an extraordinary world, spinning a tale to warm any winter's night.
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”We need a witness to our lives.  There's a billion people on the planet, what does any one life really mean? But in a marriage, you're promising to care about everything.  The good things, the bad things, the terrible things, the mundane things, all of it, all of the time, every day. "
elisedance
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« Reply #74 on: February 28, 2011, 05:55:18 AM »

wonderful accounts - I'm fascinated by the first of the two, some of that resonates with stories from my childhood...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
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