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Author Topic: Easter dinner - what are you having?  (Read 2078 times)
elisedance
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« on: April 12, 2009, 07:40:39 PM »

I'm having an easter sunday, pre-easter monday (which will be the real one so I get to post twice) easter Pickerel!

It was the freshest fish at the market yesterday - I'm not an expert at cooking this at all but it does not matter since I'm alone tonight.  Pickerel (baked whole stuffed wiht apricots and those little onions, sprinkled with parseley and marjoram and a little olive oil with potatoes and green beans.

But I'm going for red wine tonight....
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cornutt
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2009, 08:02:59 PM »

We had a Southern Easter dinner with my dad: fried chicken, green beans, corn, and deviled eggs.  And cake.   Grin

(P.S.: In the South, a traditional "dinner" is eaten at lunchtime.  The evening meal is "supper", and is a light meal compared to dinner.  I don't usually eat that way, though; only on special occasions.)

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elisedance
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2009, 08:33:59 PM »

(P.S.: In the South, a traditional "dinner" is eaten at lunchtime.  The evening meal is "supper", and is a light meal compared to dinner.  I don't usually eat that way, though; only on special occasions.)

thats very interesting - because thats exactly how it is (or at least was) in England.  we would have a big meal at lunch time and something small - baked beans on toast, welsh rarebit - in the evening.  Surely you guys just kept the English traidtion....
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cornutt
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« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2009, 08:45:30 PM »



thats very interesting - because thats exactly how it is (or at least was) in England.  we would have a big meal at lunch time and something small - baked beans on toast, welsh rarebit - in the evening.  Surely you guys just kept the English traidtion....

Probably.  A lot of Southern culture derives from English/Welsh culture of the 18th century, with some Irish that got thrown into the mix during the 19th.
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QPO
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« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2009, 09:11:21 PM »

Well Easter Sunday for us will never be the family meal as we now a an annual comp. Many years ago my sister used to have a deli (corner Store), the only day that she had free was good Friday and Christmas day. So we began a new family tradition of doing the easter Sunday thing on good Friday.

Made some lovely soup to take to the comp so that was our Sunday Meal :-)
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« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2009, 10:17:40 PM »

We only celebrate Easter with my mother's side of the faimly and we do both Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

Good Friday consists of perogies, some potato and cheese, some sauerkraut, that we get together and make a week or two beforehand - 264 of them this time around.  There is always fish of some sort; this year we did halibut and cod, as well as home made spiced french fries.

Easter Sunday was a little different this year.  We usually cook a turkey, but instead we had roast beef, ham and pulled pork.  Beyond that, we had the family staples: cabbage rolls, kielbasa (this year complete with a taste test of six different types of kielbasa to determine where we are going to purchase it from now on) since the place we usually go closed a couple of months ago.  Sweet potato casserole with apples and cranberry, salads, a bunch of veggies and cheddar mashed potatoes.
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elisedance
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« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2009, 06:28:43 AM »

lamb used to be the traditional easter dinner - and I love it myself - but no one here had it it seems.  I never heard of an easter turkey??  seems like all celebration days are becoming turkey days - is that just becaues they are big and feed a large gathering?
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elisedance
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« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2009, 10:53:35 AM »

good point.  Buy a sheep and call it a lamb Smiley  Mutton is good if stewed for a long time Smiley
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Rugby
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« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2009, 03:44:01 PM »

Pot roast, potatoes and dinner rolls.
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elisedance
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« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2009, 03:34:40 AM »

Bought fresh pork loin in the market - made roast pork with crackling (a brit specialty!!) with vegetable/quinoa, boiled kale, roasted peppers and tiny onions, and flowerake mushroom cap (found a giant one at same market) slow baked with balsamic, olive oil and japanese spice.  Oh, with a lovely medium thick gravy .... blackberries for dessert... french pinot noir 
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2009, 03:55:54 AM »

- made roast pork with crackling (a brit specialty!!)   Oh, with a lovely medium thick gravy ....

Sounds like what I would cook for Christmas Dinner
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elisedance
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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2009, 04:34:42 AM »

'cept you would have (cured) ham and not (fresh) pork, n'est pas?  Or am I wrong?
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2009, 05:04:24 AM »

'cept you would have (cured) ham and not (fresh) pork, n'est pas?  Or am I wrong?

No, no, no
We have roast pork with cracklings and/or roast duck, white and/or sugar coated potatoes, red cabbage and brown gravy.
For dessert we have cold rise pudding with almonds and cherry sauce.

Boy, you are making me hungry. Wink I can smell it and even taste it right now. Grin
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elisedance
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« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2009, 05:29:43 AM »

well, thats very different from my origins (a sister country) where we had baked ham for christmas - with potatoes, herring/red cabbage salad, etc etc

and now I'm getting hungry and I actually ate something rather similar just a few hours ago...
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emeralddancer
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« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2009, 11:24:44 AM »

can not do pork at all. (worst is I love it) but just do not eat it. (well maybe a bacon strip or 2 once a year) but nope, no pork or ham.
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