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Author Topic: Stanlding leg in waltz...  (Read 3943 times)
Rugby
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« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2009, 02:16:34 AM »

Aha, sounds like the basics of what my instructors are teaching so I would say they (if it helps two of them are the ones that teach elisedance's new pro) are along the lines of your train of thought.  I am really into body mechanics and I would say the body school of thought would be about the closest.  Are you familiar with the styles of Ieva Pauksena (sp?) and Katusha Demidova? 
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
skipper
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« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2009, 02:16:47 PM »

Aha, sounds like the basics of what my instructors are teaching so I would say they (if it helps two of them are the ones that teach elisedance's new pro) are along the lines of your train of thought.  I am really into body mechanics and I would say the body school of thought would be about the closest.  Are you familiar with the styles of Ieva Pauksena (sp?) and Katusha Demidova? 
When using the standing/supporting leg---I think of the foot (afterall, that is what is connected to the floor). I move my spine/body from the back of the heel-- to the middle of the heel--to the front of the heel--to the back of the middle--to the middle of the midle--to the front of the middle--to the back of the ball--to the middle of the ball---and on your way! This keeps you "with" the standing leg for a long time.

As far as Ieva and Katusha go, to my eyes they dance two completly different styles. It would be best if someone with a more detailed knowledge would speak to this. BUT I have always thought it best to be grounded in one way or school of dance with consistent teachers BEFORE branching out to different coaches.
At the end of the day, it is your body and you most only satisfy the person you are dancing with.
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2009, 02:24:10 PM »

When using the standing/supporting leg---I think of the foot (afterall, that is what is connected to the floor). I move my spine/body from the back of the heel-- to the middle of the heel--to the front of the heel--to the back of the middle--to the middle of the midle--to the front of the middle--to the back of the ball--to the middle of the ball---and on your way! This keeps you "with" the standing leg for a long time.

Very well put, skipper.

Quote
As far as Ieva and Katusha go, to my eyes they dance two completly different styles.

 BUT I have always thought it best to be grounded in one way or school of dance with consistent teachers BEFORE branching out to different coaches.

I would agree on both account here.

DSV
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2009, 03:04:22 PM »

I have a question to ask regarding the standing leg in dancing. Do you move gently through the thigh and knee when passing the standing leg ? For instance, in the waltz ,coming forward in promenade, the man's left leg is a three count. When the right leg passes, are you lowering and still moving a bit through that left leg while the right moves quickly ahead?

OK, I now have the information I needed and have explained the terminology to you catsmeow, so here is my answer to you. Mind you this is the way the “Body School of Thought” does it.

I am going to use the Promenade as you are talking about. I will have to use a slightly simplified version as this could get so deep that you would not be able to more.

You use the RL "Standing Foot" then RL "Standing Leg" to get the LL into position. You then change the "Standing Leg" from the RL to the LL. Now move onto the new "Standing Foot" (LF). As you start to "Lower" the LF you RL and RF should be coming under the body. When the heel of the LF hit the floor (foot position 4) the RF should closed to the LF. You are now in “Neutral Position” ready for the “Division”.

If you lower the heel prior to bringing the RF under the body, you will probable end up moving the body in a downward “projectory”, which will make the up swing very hard and almost impossible to make smooth.

Hope you understand.

DSV
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catsmeow
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« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2009, 09:38:09 PM »

thank you all for the explanations
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Rugby
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« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2009, 10:09:24 PM »

This is what I have been taught too.  What I would like to know is how the centre core and thighs move as they go forward over the standing leg or foot during the process.  Coming out of the promenade onto my RL (from the woman's point of view) I use the closing of my ankle to help bring me to neutral then continue rolling through my foot and opening my ankle to help give me the swing through the division part.  When I am "between my legs" I then using the closing of the left ankle to help pull the floor toward me.  This helps keep my body aligned and moving smoothly across the floor.  When dancing I try and use not only rolling of the heel to toe / toe to heel but also the inside, middle and outside edges of my feet depending on the move, direction and the relation of my body to my partner.  My partner is far better at the above then I and could probably explain it much better than I.  We both are very interested in the body mechanics of dancing.
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
catsmeow
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« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2009, 10:39:03 PM »

I have learned a great deal so far. Despite not knowing who taught my teachers or what school of dance I belong to I feel that dancing belongs to the movement between the feet otherwise we are merely walking. The quality of that movement dictates our success. A monkey can pass his feet but can he transfer weight with a vertical spine and horizontal shoulder line without upseting the banana on top of his head?
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Rugby
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« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2009, 10:58:14 PM »

I have learned a great deal so far. Despite not knowing who taught my teachers or what school of dance I belong to I feel that dancing belongs to the movement between the feet otherwise we are merely walking. The quality of that movement dictates our success. A monkey can pass his feet but can he transfer weight with a vertical spine and horizontal shoulder line without upseting the banana on top of his head?

Wow, I think I danced with that guy.
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
TangoDancer
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« Reply #23 on: May 15, 2009, 04:03:58 AM »

I am really into body mechanics and I would say the body school of thought would be about the closest.  Are you familiar with the styles of Ieva Pauksena (sp?) and Katusha Demidova? 
Of course.

This is what I have been taught too.  What I would like to know is how the centre core and thighs move as they go forward over the standing leg or foot during the process.    My partner is far better at the above then I and could probably explain it much better than I.  We both are very interested in the body mechanics of dancing.

It sounds as though you have this quite well, actually. Am I misunderstanding the query?

When using the standing/supporting leg---I think of the foot (afterall, that is what is connected to the floor). I move my spine/body from the back of the heel-- to the middle of the heel--to the front of the heel--to the back of the middle--to the middle of the midle--to the front of the middle--to the back of the ball--to the middle of the ball---and on your way! This keeps you "with" the standing leg for a long time.

Very well put, skipper.  DSV

DSV,  You and I are always together on things, and I might have issue w/ Skipper's post. Would you expound on this, please? Of course, you know what my issue is. Though Skipper is correct in that the impetus is in the feet/coming from the floor, we also know that we are rarely moving from the heels -front. middle, or otherwise. We must dance w/ CPA which places us over the arches, and the spine is held straight from there. The weight is never on the heels...not even on a heel turn. Or am I misunderstanding because it is 2h30 in the a.m.?
« Last Edit: May 15, 2009, 04:05:58 AM by TangoDancer » Logged

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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2009, 12:34:46 PM »

DSV,  You and I are always together on things, and I might have issue w/ Skipper's post. Would you expound on this, please? Of course, you know what my issue is. Though Skipper is correct in that the impetus is in the feet/coming from the floor, we also know that we are rarely moving from the heels -front. middle, or otherwise. We must dance w/ CPA which places us over the arches, and the spine is held straight from there. The weight is never on the heels...not even on a heel turn. Or am I misunderstanding because it is 2h30 in the a.m.?

I saw skipper's post as what is done in basic forward movement. If you move forward from "Neutral Position", you take a heel lead and the weight moves from "on" to "in" to "out", so every step you take has the concept of "on, in and out". If you are up and going forward, then the "on" is of course on the toe. If you are moving forward while in neutral you will have the "on" be on the heel. I think skipper was referring to the movement of a heel as "on" and moving towards the "in".

That was my take on skipper's post. I could be wrong; I guess skipper will have to let us know.
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
Rugby
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« Reply #25 on: May 15, 2009, 01:13:53 PM »

I guess I am always questioning myself that I may not be understanding it properly.  It is good to have confirmation that at least I'm on the correct path.  I find the latin and standard have many of the same principles for body control and use.
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2009, 01:37:13 PM »

I find the latin and standard have many of the same principles for body control and use.

Basic movement is basic movement.......
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
Rugby
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« Reply #27 on: May 15, 2009, 01:42:56 PM »

Thats what I always tell people, its the same body we are moving.
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
Dora-Satya Veda
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Posts: 6871


« Reply #28 on: May 15, 2009, 02:47:49 PM »

Thats what I always tell people, its the same body we are moving.

you got it Wink
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
Sarosh
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« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2009, 09:50:33 AM »

when the right leg is under the body there is no more lowering. it should be finished and the movement continuing to the next division.  i don't think we ever 'stop'.
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