partnerdanceonline.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 30, 2014, 06:17:01 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
A lot of people are visiting Smiley Smiley
Undecided Undecided but not many are posting....
please say hi Cheesy
116457 Posts in 1855 Topics by 221 Members
Latest Member: EVE_Dance
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  partnerdanceonline.com
|-+  Partner Dancing
| |-+  Partner Dances
| | |-+  Ballroom dance -advanced (Moderators: Rugby, cornutt, ZPomeroy)
| | | |-+  Stanlding leg in waltz...
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print
Author Topic: Stanlding leg in waltz...  (Read 3839 times)
catsmeow
Bronze
*
Posts: 339


« on: May 12, 2009, 09:47:00 PM »

I have a question to ask regarding the standing leg in dancing. Do you move gently through the thigh and knee when passing the standing leg ? For instance, in the waltz ,coming forward in promenade, the man's left leg is a three count. When the right leg passes, are you lowering and still moving a bit through that left leg while the right moves quickly ahead?
« Last Edit: May 12, 2009, 10:09:51 PM by elisedance » Logged
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2009, 10:14:36 PM »

I have a question to ask regarding the standing leg in dancing. Do you move gently through the thigh and knee when passing the standing leg ? For instance, in the waltz ,coming forward in promenade, the man's left leg is a three count. When the right leg passes, are you lowering and still moving a bit through that left leg while the right moves quickly ahead?

I am a bit confused are you talking/asking about the standing leg or the standing foot Huh
Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
SwingWaltz
Gold Star
***
Posts: 5772


« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2009, 10:15:28 PM »

I continue to lower into my standing leg as my right leg passes it.
I wouldn't exactly move my right leg quickly ahead (as you stated) it's more of a smooth transition between into the standing leg, collect, then move out of your standing leg.
Logged
catsmeow
Bronze
*
Posts: 339


« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2009, 10:34:17 PM »

DSV: I think I mean both leg and foot. I would appreciate what you have to say
Logged
catsmeow
Bronze
*
Posts: 339


« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2009, 10:37:55 PM »

Swingwaltz: thanks for your input. do you place your full weight on the heel of the standing leg before passing . I have seen this happen in the pro ranks when coming out of promenade
Logged
SwingWaltz
Gold Star
***
Posts: 5772


« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2009, 11:05:05 PM »

You come out of promenade on the toe, and since the next step is forward, so I try to keep my weight forward of my body. So I don't put my weight on the heel. I'd say probably towards the ball of the foot.
Logged
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2009, 11:20:40 PM »

I am not trying to be funny here but I do have some question for you before I answer.

Dance like any other profession has it own language and then there are the 4 schools of though each having their own dialect. Another problem is that each school of thought does the actions you are asking about slightly different. So, you can see there are some problems in telling you what to do. We need to know the same terminology. If there is a misunderstanding because of not using the same terminologies, the result could be disastrous. I am not sure you and I understand the same terminology and that can cause big problem when explaining the actions used in dancing. I want to make sure you understand what I am talking about so here are my questions.

You are welcome to PM me the answers if you don’t want to answer them in public.

What school of thought do you and/or your teacher following?

Do you understand the difference between “the standing leg” and “the standing foot”?

Do you understand the difference between “lower” and “down/division”?

Do you understand what “standing in neutral” means?
« Last Edit: May 12, 2009, 11:45:36 PM by Dora-Satya Veda » Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
catsmeow
Bronze
*
Posts: 339


« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2009, 11:30:27 PM »

Dora:  I knew you were gettng to a point. Looking at the questions, the ole exposure of the guy who doesnt really know what he is talking about  alarm bells are going off. I cant answer any of your questions accurately now that I am forced to think about it.
Logged
catsmeow
Bronze
*
Posts: 339


« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2009, 11:38:44 PM »

swingwaltz: I try to do the same but in videos of myself with partner I have a small stoppage of movement as my moving leg passes my non moving leg. It irritates me to see it.
Logged
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2009, 11:39:12 PM »

Dora:  I knew you were gettng to a point. Looking at the questions, the ole exposure of the guy who doesnt really know what he is talking about  alarm bells are going off. I cant answer any of your questions accurately now that I am forced to think about it.

Not to worry. I will help you but it will take a little time to explain it all. I will PM you to help you understand the terminologies. We will then continue this topic when you and I are on the same page Wink

You have a PM coming.

Dora-Satya Veda
« Last Edit: May 12, 2009, 11:44:40 PM by Dora-Satya Veda » Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
catsmeow
Bronze
*
Posts: 339


« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2009, 11:43:47 PM »

Dora : you are both kind and patient. Others might like to your explanations. No need to pm. Post away.
Logged
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2009, 02:21:02 PM »

I am not sure if the answer to each of these questions should be different topics. Elise please help/advise here.
Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35006


ee


« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2009, 04:43:18 PM »

If you feel they should be two different issues then please create a new topic - let me know what to rename the old one.  Alternatively, let either myself or Cornutt know what the two should be called and we'll set them up.

I'm going to be a bit spotty contact over the next two days while in Ottawa.... but should check in each evening at least (maybe during the meeting if I can get away wiht it).
ee
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Rugby
Moderator
Gold
****
Posts: 3596



« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2009, 01:28:08 AM »

Dora:  I knew you were gettng to a point. Looking at the questions, the ole exposure of the guy who doesnt really know what he is talking about  alarm bells are going off. I cant answer any of your questions accurately now that I am forced to think about it.

You could catsmeow but the questions are asked in a way you are not used to.  It's not that you don't know the answers, just the lingo.  DSV will be able to help you out anyways I'm sure.  We all just have to learn the same "dance language" so we can understand each other. 
Logged

Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
TangoDancer
Open Bronze
*
Posts: 736



« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2009, 01:40:47 AM »

Hope this helps.....

DSV and I are almost always on the same page, so while you are classifying language with her, try this (it should work well with her advice, regardless);

Stand in a correct dance posture with the weight over the right side. Swing forward onto the left foot (heel lead, of course) allowing the right foot to roll over the ball and off of the toes, and the leg to pull naturally toward the movement. As teh weight is positioned over the now standing left, allow the right leg/foot to point slightly sidewards. You will feel the desire to rest (lower) into the hips as this movement/momentum completes. Repeat this on the other side. Of course, what you are learning is the correct positioning/movement/collection of the first part of the left/right closed changes (progressives or half boxes depending on school).

This is the feeling whether you are dancing the closed change, running step, or promenade. To answer your question, the ankles will come together as you feel this resting into the hips part that we discussed above. The movement will conclude "after" this with a slight lifting of both heels from the floor. Now, defrring back to DSV, we must know which school you are learning before we can tell you the next step (some follow through with the second step as a toe; I, for example, take the second step as a heel and late rise, particular only to this promenade step).
Logged

The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!