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| | | |-+  Difference between the shoulder check vs. the stop and go
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Author Topic: Difference between the shoulder check vs. the stop and go  (Read 956 times)
Dancerette
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« on: April 15, 2009, 10:37:23 AM »

We originally learned East Coast Swing, where we were taught the shoulder check.

We recently learned the stop and go in jive, and it seems to be technically the same, although the timing is different.

Are there some subtle yet oh-so-important differences that we just haven't clued into yet?
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cornutt
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« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2009, 11:29:13 AM »

I have to admit I've never heard of the stop and go.

When you do the shoulder check in ECS, do you do it to lindy timing?  (triple step, 1-2, triple step, 1-2)
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Dancerette
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Posts: 123


« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2009, 12:57:42 PM »

Yes, that's the timing we use, with the 1-2 being the hold, (man's right leg extended in check position, my left extended)

The stop and go is on our Dance Vision jive DVD, but I sure don't see much difference between the two. I vaguely remember our instructors jazzing up the stop and go so it looked crazy cool; we did it a couple times, but now can't remember.

I seem to say that a lot during this journey of learning to dance Wink
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cornutt
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2009, 01:37:51 PM »

Yes, that's the same way I dance it in ECS. 

Could be that it's just one of the many steps that's called one thing by American-style dancers, and another thing by International-style dancers.  (E.g., "crossover" vs. "New Yorker")  It's a versatile step that appears in several different dances with somewhat different timings; in addition to ECS, I dance it in rumba and cha-cha, and it could probably be done in salsa too.  I know little about jive, so I can't say much other than that there is probably some adaptation of the timing that makes it fit the timing of jive better. 
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Medira
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« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2009, 07:47:06 PM »

Footwork-wise, it is the same step.  It is the technique where the two steps differ. Smiley
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QPO
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« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2009, 07:57:10 PM »

We also use a stop and go in a Rumba routine that we learn, it may be called a different name your way.


I have to admit I've never heard of the stop and go.

When you do the shoulder check in ECS, do you do it to lindy timing?  (triple step, 1-2, triple step, 1-2)
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elisedance
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« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2010, 04:18:21 AM »

Just saw this old topic - and it reminded me of the hockey-ballroom blend idea Cheesy
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cornutt
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« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2010, 12:48:49 AM »

Just saw this old topic - and it reminded me of the hockey-ballroom blend idea Cheesy

Penalty on #15, Stanley, two minutes for shoulder check!   Grin
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elisedance
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« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2010, 01:10:48 AM »

hey, but my partner made me do it !!

OK, so guilty but don't I get credit for Nicing?
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2010, 05:53:54 AM »

Footwork-wise, it is the same step.  It is the technique where the two steps differ. Smiley

This is correct.

Could be that it's just one of the many steps that's called one thing by American-style dancers, and another thing by International-style dancers.  (E.g., "crossover" vs. "New Yorker") 

Technically, these are NOT the same step. I know that many persons dance them the same, but it has always been one of the misconceptions that I stress to my dancers. The crossover is exactly what it says it is: it is danced from a facing the partner position, and crosses over in order to execute. The New York is not a crossover, it is a forward walk; where the preceding step finished with a quarter turn so that the patnership is almost side by side. The NY is then taken straight ahead. Yes, sloppily, these steps are often taught/danced the same.
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