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Author Topic: Tango - advanced  (Read 5287 times)
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #60 on: September 14, 2010, 04:43:17 AM »

For me the key to tango was: when you take a step, point the foot in the direction of the next step.  That kills all pivoting actions and goes a long way to killing flight.
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

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ZPomeroy
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« Reply #61 on: September 24, 2010, 10:03:50 AM »

As i mentioned in the Quantal shift thread i have been playing around with my frame, specifically the amount in which i create left side poise. I decided to give tango a go  (i had alway never been able to get the attack, and the feeling of tango) and was able to create such power in my movement through the steps. The attack was something i had never felt before, but with one little change to my frame i was able to create this. So how closely related to the attack and feeling of tango is the frame? is this just a fluke that they both occurred at the same time? or did my change in frame and left side poise affect the way in which i was able to do the steps? would be very interested to find out.

Zac
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Dance is poetry written for the feet, read by the heart, and destined for the soul.
Some guy
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« Reply #62 on: September 24, 2010, 02:52:01 PM »

As i mentioned in the Quantal shift thread i have been playing around with my frame, specifically the amount in which i create left side poise. I decided to give tango a go  (i had alway never been able to get the attack, and the feeling of tango) and was able to create such power in my movement through the steps. The attack was something i had never felt before, but with one little change to my frame i was able to create this. So how closely related to the attack and feeling of tango is the frame? is this just a fluke that they both occurred at the same time? or did my change in frame and left side poise affect the way in which i was able to do the steps? would be very interested to find out.

Zac
It's going to affect everything.  Your partner will also feel much better now dancing with you.  One of the first illusions I found out in ballroom dancing was that it's not the right side that does all the work.  The left side contributes equally.  Later on, the further down the rabbit hole you go, you'll realize that there is no frame.   Cool
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SwingWaltz
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« Reply #63 on: September 25, 2010, 12:09:21 PM »

As i mentioned in the Quantal shift thread i have been playing around with my frame, specifically the amount in which i create left side poise. I decided to give tango a go  (i had alway never been able to get the attack, and the feeling of tango) and was able to create such power in my movement through the steps. The attack was something i had never felt before, but with one little change to my frame i was able to create this. So how closely related to the attack and feeling of tango is the frame? is this just a fluke that they both occurred at the same time? or did my change in frame and left side poise affect the way in which i was able to do the steps? would be very interested to find out.

Zac

I've been working on this very recently. The "attack" feeling you get from having a left side poise (if you are doing what we discussed the other day) might also bring your body weight on to your front foot too early (especially in promenade position), results in flight. You probably don't want so much flight in your tango. Your weight should still be on your stand foot (back foot), so you can use it to power off.
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elisedance
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« Reply #64 on: September 25, 2010, 07:09:50 PM »

"You probably don't want so much flight in your tango."
So much?  You don't want any.  Not even an excuse for some.

For me the biggest discovery to kill flight, other than staying level, is to rotate the foot in the direction of the next step before touching the floor.  That kills any pivoting actions and keeps you grounded.

Which is off subject but I thought I would just add that anyway Cheesy
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
SwingWaltz
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« Reply #65 on: September 25, 2010, 10:34:24 PM »

"You probably don't want so much flight in your tango."
So much?  You don't want any.  Not even an excuse for some.

For me the biggest discovery to kill flight, other than staying level, is to rotate the foot in the direction of the next step before touching the floor.  That kills any pivoting actions and keeps you grounded.

Which is off subject but I thought I would just add that anyway Cheesy

Thank you!

Yea the rotating of the foot in the direction of the next step make me feel retarded sometimes. But apparently it feels good on the other end and it looks good, so meh! But to think about it in a positive way, it's the perfect chance for me to act retarded on the dance floor!  Roll Eyes
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #66 on: September 27, 2010, 02:37:05 AM »

As i mentioned in the Quantal shift thread i have been playing around with my frame, specifically the amount in which i create left side poise. So how closely related to the attack and feeling of tango is the frame? is this just a fluke that they both occurred at the same time? or did my change in frame and left side poise affect the way in which i was able to do the steps? would be very interested to find out.

Zac

Very much so, but it's position... not frame.

It's going to affect everything.  Later on, the further down the rabbit hole you go, you'll realize that there is no frame.   Cool

Yeah, kind of what I was getting at. That'll be fun.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
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