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Author Topic: Tango - advanced  (Read 5678 times)
Some guy
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« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2009, 11:05:43 AM »

DSV's 2 cents is like my $20,000.  So, in comparison, here's my 0.000000000000000000002 cents worth (!).

I believe the bending of the knees occurs as a "reaction" rather than an action.  When you need speed and power to fight inertia and move, the body automatically bends the knees.  It doesn't feel like you're doing it, but it happens.  It's like running: your body automatically bends its knees if and when necessary to create the movement but if you intentionally bend your knees and try to run you'll look rather funny doing it, let alone the fact that your movement will be severely impaired. 
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2009, 12:13:27 PM »

DSV's 2 cents is like my $20,000.  So, in comparison, here's my 0.000000000000000000002 cents worth (!).

Thank you SG. Embarrassed     You are so kind.   Kiss

Quote
I believe the bending of the knees occurs as a "reaction" rather than an action.  When you need speed and power to fight inertia and move, the body automatically bends the knees.  It doesn't feel like you're doing it, but it happens.  It's like running: your body automatically bends its knees if and when necessary to create the movement but if you intentionally bend your knees and try to run you'll look rather funny doing it, let alone the fact that your movement will be severely impaired. 

We were actually told to not use the word "bend". We were told to replace the word "bend" with the word "flexed" or "flexing".

I do however agree with you SG. There is a natural flexing of knees when you dance well.

Dora-Satya Veda
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
dream a little dream
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« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2009, 12:34:22 PM »

Aha!  I get it now.  My instructor always says flexed.....as in always ready to move.
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2009, 12:53:37 PM »

Aha!  I get it now.  My instructor always says flexed.....as in always ready to move.

Yes, you got it Wink Grin
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
Bordertangoman
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« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2009, 01:58:21 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZlBUglE6Hc

I found this clip demonstrating the correct tango walk. Wink

lots of knee bending.
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2009, 03:28:10 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZlBUglE6Hc

I found this clip demonstrating the correct tango walk. Wink

lots of knee bending.

Yes, I agree there is some bending of knees here. When I first moved to London that was about the way I did my Tango walks, with time it somehow changed. I got a grant from my former government to develop my tango walk.

I have been looking for that demonstration for years, thank you for finding it for me.  Smiley
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2009, 04:25:40 PM »

Love your currency - your 2c is $200 in my country... Wink
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Bordertangoman
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« Reply #22 on: June 16, 2009, 08:04:32 AM »

there is also drunken master style kung fu; fall everywhere;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8Iic9EUqdA
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”We need a witness to our lives.  There's a billion people on the planet, what does any one life really mean? But in a marriage, you're promising to care about everything.  The good things, the bad things, the terrible things, the mundane things, all of it, all of the time, every day. "
Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2009, 11:18:37 AM »

there is also drunken master style kung fu; fall everywhere;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8Iic9EUqdA

With that kind of foot work, center work and body awareness I am sure he would do well. Many champions have been known to have a drink before walking on the floor so he would fit right in. Cheesy Maybe we should invite him to a competition.  Cheesy
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2009, 11:08:02 AM »

Worked on foot action - pro describes it as putting the floot into the floor - I'm obviously skimming over it! Also speeding up my legs - firm contact followed by quick legs - minimal body rotations - lots of head work... its starting to really move - and lots of fun!
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
TangoDancer
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« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2009, 06:25:40 AM »

So complexed. Keep it up.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2009, 05:19:40 AM »

here we are, popped over form the FT topic.

So how does one apply body school to tango?  And where is the rise....
Initially, I was taught that you lower when you are initiating a forward movement in tango - a compression that was supposed to give you the power to move forward. I had one teacher that said the opposite: you actually rise into the action - though its a body rise not a leg one.  I think at teh moment DP and I are staying pretty much flat - we are still working on leg action and getting the ground-grip that is essential for tango.  However, I think it still feels like too much effort....
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Some guy
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« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2009, 05:23:58 AM »

If it feels like effort, then it's not Body School.  I just read what you wrote ont he Foxtrot thread.  It's basically the same thing, except that in Tango, you rise into the step on each step.  In Foxtrot, rise occurs over more than one step.  Rising into the step, if I'm understanding it correctly, sounds like it's right.  The man lowers his ribcage to signify movement and raises it to stop.  So it does feel like a "rise" into the step.  That's only from the man's perspective 'though.  Not too sure what the lady does.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 05:28:22 AM by Some guy » Logged
elisedance
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« Reply #28 on: December 01, 2009, 05:30:24 AM »

If it feels like effort, then it's not Body School. 
I got that much! Cheesy

Rising into the step, if I'm understanding it correctly, sounds like it's right.  The man lowers his ribcage to signify movement and raises it to stop.  So it does feel like a "rise" into the step. 

But how does one make it efficient?  It seems like tango is the least efficient way of moving two bodies accross a floor.  I mean it really is NOT like walking at all - no swing, continual floor contact etc.  What is the body-school's take on conservation of energy?
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
TangoDancer
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« Reply #29 on: December 01, 2009, 05:32:09 AM »

here we are, popped over form the FT topic.

So how does one apply body school to tango?  And where is the rise....
Initially, I was taught that you lower when you are initiating a forward movement in tango - a compression that was supposed to give you the power to move forward. I had one teacher that said the opposite: you actually rise into the action - though its a body rise not a leg one.  I think at teh moment DP and I are staying pretty much flat - we are still working on leg action and getting the ground-grip that is essential for tango.  However, I think it still feels like too much effort....

Just posted about this in the fox thread; perhaps what precipitated your post.

Bill Irvine called this "monumental stillness". He was referring to the stillness of the body/topline as the feet/legs did all the work. Of course, he was referring to movement; this left the body/topline free for shaping, which, in tango, happens afterwards. You are correct... there is no rise/lower in tango. However, there is very definite level changing happening constantly, and, yes, there is a difference.

You are also correct in employing the feet/legs for thrusting. Yet, we remember to maintain the body to be weighted in the middle of the steps. This can be lost especially easily in the int'l. when this is danced well, one will feel truly grounded; sharp, staccato, cat-like.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
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