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Author Topic: Mentor - mentoree; who figures in your life?  (Read 4868 times)
elisedance
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« on: May 02, 2009, 04:36:26 AM »

This springs from Some Guy's comment on the Dream Lesson topic in ballroom dance. 

Some personal interactions at work or for an interest, such as career dance or personal development, involve a relationship where an experienced and knowledgeable individual does more than pass information on but cares and guides another.  These relationships can have an enormous impact on both people and the result can be a bonding that may be closer than with a parent or sibling.

Do you, or have you had a relationship that you would describe as a mentor?
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SwingWaltz
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2009, 08:03:05 AM »

I think I really need one at the moment  Embarrassed
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elisedance
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2009, 08:13:08 AM »

what doyou need, grasshopper?
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2009, 11:12:03 AM »

I have been fortunate to have 8 such wonderful people in my life. Five of them helped/helps me through the ins and outs of the dancing and the dance business. The other 3 has been guiding/is guiding me in matters of human potential and the understanding of being, which does tie into dancing as well. Each of my mentors has had an enormous impact on my life and I would not be where I am today, if they had not been part of my life. I will be forever grateful to each and every one of them for the care and generosity they all showed/show me. They were all very, very tough and accepted no nonsense from me in any way or form. They would not hesitate to tell/slap/chock me when I was wrong, misbehaved or remind me when I was my own worst enemy. I could disagree with them, argue with them, challenge them and ask all sorts of question but never did the love and care waver even for one second. Their never judged me, but they would allow me to judge myself. They all allowed me to find myself and find out what I was about. Their love and care was totally unconditional. Every one of them were/are very adamant about giving/passing their gift onto others. One of the promises that I had to make to each of them is that I would not keep the gift; they gave me, to myself.

If I am ever blessed with another mentor in my life, I would absolutely jump at the opportunity but unfortunately such opportunities don’t come about often.

Dora-Satya Veda
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elisedance
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2009, 04:41:53 PM »

...well, you've also passed on what it is to be a mentor - to inform to open the eyes and to help impart discipline.  But not to judge.  You mentor because the person concerned will grow to equal you and hopefully exceed you in your area - it is therefore essential that you do not crush the spirit.
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
emeralddancer
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2009, 11:23:27 AM »

My mentor, teacher, friend is here on PDO. (I have a few others, but she was the first to open my blind eyes)

She has such a gift and I am truly humbled and honored to have her in my life. Each day I am thankful. It has and IS making such a HUGE impact in my life and not just with dancing.

This is the beauty of someone who knows how to get a person to think, to get out of themselves and apply what is being taught for dance in life and to apply what is taught in life to dance.
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It is more important who they are as people and only then is it important who they are as dancers.~Marcia Haydee
cornutt
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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2009, 11:59:49 AM »

I remember one particular high school teacher.  If you'd known him, you would have considered him an unlikely mentor -- he was crotchety, blunt, and had zero tolerance for foolishness.  But I came to realize that he did a lot of things to clear the path for anyone who was willing to stand up for themselves and explain why they deserved an opportunity.  Standing up for myself was a difficult lesson for me to learn, so his teaching was quite valuable to me. 

About eight years ago, I was assigned a protege at work.  This was a new experience for me.  The protege was a young lady who had interned with the company; she had just graduated and was starting full-time work.  I quickly came to realize that she was not only bright, but also very self-motivated.  There were also things about her, mannerisms and such, that I found familiar, and in talking, we eventually realized that we had had a lot of similar childhood experiences.  We wound up bonding on both a professional and a personal (but non-romantic) level.  This served us well when we went through an intense, gut-wrenching experience together a couple of years later: working side-by-side for about thirty days straight on an incredibly difficult and demanding project.  We, our whole team, went through it together thinking that we were building a bright future for our group and for the company that was our customer.  We pulled together and we were about as solid as any project team anywhere, ever.  My protege and I practically worked as one person, one mind, during that time. 

Unfortunately, literally minutes before it looked like we would achieve a successful outcome, tragedy struck.  Through no fault of our team, there was a horrible accident; people got killed and millions of dollars invested were lost.  It was very public, and it resulted in a change in national policy that made future projects like the one we were working on impossible.  Our customer eventually was put out of business by the financial impact, and our team was scattered to the four winds.  I helped my protege through this period, and she helped me, before we were both eventually transferred to different projects. 

She's doing very well now, in an engineering leadership position that keeps her very busy.  And she's happily married, with two children.  The guy she married is a great guy.  She dodged pitfalls, in both her professional and personal life, and I think I can take some of the credit for that.  She returned the favor by giving me a lot of insights about myself. 
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dream a little dream
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« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2009, 12:22:01 PM »

I would like to think that people on this board are my mentors, a few in particular.
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2009, 12:38:01 PM »

This is the beauty of someone who knows how to get a person to think, to get out of themselves and apply what is being taught for dance in life and to apply what is taught in life to dance.

Wow EM that sounds great. Smiley My "father", teacher and mentor would clap his hands if you said that to him. You are saying something really profound here. You really impressed me with that comment. Keep it up.
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Edward Teller
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« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2009, 07:13:02 PM »

This is the beauty of someone who knows how to get a person to think, to get out of themselves and apply what is being taught for dance in life and to apply what is taught in life to dance.

I echo Dora's assessment of this statement.  Beautiful! ...and it's spot on with what I've experienced with my "secret" mentor.   Cheesy  It requires the personality of a Vulcan/Betazoid hybrid to pull something like that off.   Wink
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emeralddancer
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« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2009, 08:51:10 PM »

This is the beauty of someone who knows how to get a person to think, to get out of themselves and apply what is being taught for dance in life and to apply what is taught in life to dance.

Wow EM that sounds great. Smiley My "father", teacher and mentor would clap his hands if you said that to him. You are saying something really profound here. You really impressed me with that comment. Keep it up.


Well ... my mentor/mom/teacher/friend ....she said it to me, a bit different, but I am "getting" it. I will always and forever be grateful, that she sees in me what I could not. Was able to open my blind eyes.

Or as she would say ... it is not her. She is the instrument used to help me with the answers I was ready to hear, I knew ... but she was the conduent (is that the right word?) so I could understand.

She knows I have much more to learn, further to go. I am glad and happy, that she is by me every step of the way. That she has hugs enough when I need them, and to give them when it is needed. That she does not mince words and will be stern when need be. She has an intuitive "sense" of how much is enough, and when something is not enough or quite right.  I am thankful for her wisdom and her teachers before her. Because if they did not, I would not have this gift.

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It is more important who they are as people and only then is it important who they are as dancers.~Marcia Haydee
emeralddancer
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« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2009, 08:52:23 PM »

This is the beauty of someone who knows how to get a person to think, to get out of themselves and apply what is being taught for dance in life and to apply what is taught in life to dance.

I echo Dora's assessment of this statement.  Beautiful! ...and it's spot on with what I've experienced with my "secret" mentor.   Cheesy  It requires the personality of a Vulcan/Betazoid hybrid to pull something like that off.   Wink

Yes, agreed. Some Guy ... you are right ... maybe I am more the hybrid than I thought. LOL Wink
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It is more important who they are as people and only then is it important who they are as dancers.~Marcia Haydee
malakawa
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« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2009, 03:24:29 PM »

i had couple of them, and actually still have them if i need them.

in this business you never stop learning. each day you learn something new.  Cheesy

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dream a little dream
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« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2009, 01:23:23 PM »



I will always and forever be grateful, that she sees in me what I could not.
[/quote]

That is what I think we all look for in a mentor. 
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2009, 12:06:09 AM »

That is what I think we all look for in a mentor. 

Totally agree on that one
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
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