partnerdanceonline.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 22, 2014, 04:13:54 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
A lot of people are visiting Smiley Smiley
Undecided Undecided but not many are posting....
please say hi Cheesy
116448 Posts in 1855 Topics by 221 Members
Latest Member: EVE_Dance
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  partnerdanceonline.com
|-+  Partner Dancing
| |-+  Dancesport
| | |-+  Professional (Moderators: Rugby, cornutt)
| | | |-+  Decision to go pro?
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] Print
Author Topic: Decision to go pro?  (Read 6761 times)
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35001


ee


« Reply #60 on: April 02, 2010, 09:43:09 PM »

perhaps in my next lifetime Cheesy
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
standarddancer
Open Bronze
*
Posts: 590



WWW
« Reply #61 on: May 23, 2010, 11:53:08 PM »

I also turn pro because of a new partnership - I split with the amateur partner whom I reached US amateur National final together, there had been no suitable partner for me in the US amateur circuit so at coach's recommendation, I started tryouts with pros, tried current DP and he's the most suitable one so we started compete together.

For me I care about my dancing and long term improvement, I don't really care if I dance amateur or professional, if my current DP is amateur and wish to stay amateur I don't mind stay amateur.

The main difference between amateur and pro comps in USA is even at small pro comps, scholarship checks are bigger - We are doing fine at small comps RS division and sometimes making final in open, so usually each time there are scholarship money of at least $200-$300 to take home and no need to pay admission tickets to dance our session, as amateur, we used to be charged $50 per admission ticket just to dance our own session, and finalist scholarship checks for major amateur comps in US are usually around or under $100. However, bigger bucks are needed to take coaching lessons all the time.

DP doesn't understand why some good dancers remain amateur status in US, for him makes no sense to dance amateur, he has 2 pro-am students, he has to have pro status to take students to floor. I think those good dancers remain amateurs because in USA amateurs are allowed to teach/show to make money and it really makes no difference until you have one or more pro-am students interested in competing with you.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2010, 11:54:59 PM by standarddancer » Logged

Selling my amazingly beautiful dresses! NEW ADDITIONS!!!
http://public.fotki.com/standart/ballgown-for-sale/
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35001


ee


« Reply #62 on: May 24, 2010, 07:16:10 AM »

Thanks for that insight SD.  Seems to me you guys are right where you need to be - making top three in the RS and 'being noticed' at the pro level.  Shows a lot of promise. Perpahs we'll get a link to a video soon?  

I started the 'quantal leap' topic on DF originally because I wondered if it was possible for an old lady like me to go pro and compete.  At the time there was actually a guy here that needed a partner.  I still wonder about that - I have no delusions of grandeur but it would be a heck of a dance dream to achieve that.... Now I am very happy to be working on AM with a partner that has very similar (and much more moderate) goals.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2010, 07:26:32 AM by elisedance » Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #63 on: May 27, 2010, 05:17:54 AM »

I don't think it's something everyone is ready for when they do it. I certainly wasn't... I was freaking out as I was registering with NDCA (the governing body for Pros in the states). And then when I got my membership card in the mail I was just staring at and couldn't believe it. I was completely under-prepared for my first competition. I went from my last Am comp to my first Pro comp, with a new partner and new style in less than 2 months. I had never danced Bolero or Mambo before then. I did a number to myself mentally, let me tell you. But by the 2nd competition, I was totally ready and excited for it.

That sounds like me Tongue. I was so not ready to turn professional at all. I was dancing Amateur in January and by the middle of February I was professional. I danced my first professional competition in April. The first 4 competitions that I danced, I have very little recollection off. Actually my third competition was in Germany and I would have sworn on my life that I was not in Germany that year. It was actually not until a student, 4 years after I retired, showed me a video of the competition and I saw myself dance. It didn’t really dawn on me that I was professional till I had done my IDTA membership exam in November that year. The first time I felt I was really professional was two year later when a couple I taught made the British Open final in Amateur and I had done my IDTA Fellowship exam the week before.

So I would agree it is not all that turn professional that is ready for it.
Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35001


ee


« Reply #64 on: May 27, 2010, 05:48:12 AM »

Is anyone?  I mean there are no practise runs at being a pro - you are leaving an environment that you have experienced often from childhood and suddenly entering one that you have seen through that period but only as an outsider.

These rights of passage are common to most career growths with some symbolic event that switches you from being in the 'learner' group to the 'teacher'.  Obviously the latter has to keep learning but its in a very different way.  Thus, attaining a professional qualification or getting your first paid job - all have an element of horror as well as pride - and sometimes the former can totally dominate the latter!
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
SwingWaltz
Gold Star
***
Posts: 5772


« Reply #65 on: May 27, 2010, 06:53:50 AM »

These rights of passage are common to most career growths with some symbolic event that switches you from being in the 'learner' group to the 'teacher'.  Obviously the latter has to keep learning but its in a very different way. 

So pro = teacher?

What if I'm still an amateur and a teacher at the same time. Does that mean I'm doing both an amateur and a pro's job?

It is kind of hard, because sometimes I could not teach my students the same way I was taught. For example, if I was to teach a fallaway reverse slip pivot in waltz, I would not teach it the same way as I was taught (coach yelling across the room "more contra"). I feel like I need to study every figure twice, once for myself and once for my students.

Is that what you guys do? Or do you teach your students the same way you are taught?
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35001


ee


« Reply #66 on: May 27, 2010, 07:13:05 AM »

These rights of passage are common to most career growths with some symbolic event that switches you from being in the 'learner' group to the 'teacher'.  Obviously the latter has to keep learning but its in a very different way. 

So pro = teacher?

What if I'm still an amateur and a teacher at the same time. Does that mean I'm doing both an amateur and a pro's job?

I think in the above contect a 'pro' is a dancer that competes in the professional, not amateur ranks.  They don't actually have to teach but most do to support themselves.
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Dora-Satya Veda
Gold Star
***
Posts: 6871


« Reply #67 on: May 27, 2010, 11:01:58 AM »

What if I'm still an amateur and a teacher at the same time. Does that mean I'm doing both an amateur and a pro's job?

My teacher said it was very different to be a teacher and a dancer and I would very much agree with that. As a dancer you only need to know what works for you to do it. When you are a teacher then you need to know at least 4 (top teachers know at least 10) different was to explain the same movement. The system used to be that as long as you were an amateur or competitor then you only learned the way that worked for you and not any other ways of doing it. When you then turned professional and started teaching then you would learn others ways of doing it so that you were better qualified as a teacher. If you only focus on what works for you then it is easier to become a great dancer fast but you will not be a good teacher because you can only teach what you have learned.

It is a little bit of a dilemma, because to become a great dancer you need to focus 100% on what works for you, but to become a great teacher, you need to focus on all the possible ways of doing the same thing. My teacher actually told students that it could be dangerous to only take lessons from competing teachers (whether amateurs or professionals) as they were still focusing on how and what they needed to do to improve their own dancing. I actually often hear new teachers or competing teachers teach their students the same lesson they just had themselves whether the student is ready to hear that or not.

Quote
It is kind of hard, because sometimes I could not teach my students the same way I was taught. I feel like I need to study every figure twice, once for myself and once for my students.


That is why my teacher used to say that to become a great dancer, you would be better off not teaching until the basic principles were down solid. I do realize that teaching dancing is a way for many dancers to make money to pay for their own lessons but it sure can cause things to take much longer. It will especially take longer if you try to become a great teacher and learn to do things in more ways then what works for you and your partner.

Quote
Is that what you guys do? Or do you teach your students the same way you are taught?

When I retired then my teacher had me be an apprentice to learn to teach. I spend my first year as a competing professional with hardly any teaching as my teacher wanted the basic principles to be solid before I started to learn other ways of doing things and thereby to teach. I think I did mention this earlier. Many competitors teach their students the lessons they just had with no regard to whether the students is ready for it. I do agree that the students probably have the same problem but the question is “are they ready to have that corrected?”
Example: You are building a house and you just learned how to put the roof on the walls of your house. Your student has just laid the foundation and is not ready to put the roof on as there is no walls as of yet. How to put a roof on the house is good information but it is really irrelevant to the student that has no walls to their house.

Sorry for this long post. I got carried away.

DSV


Logged

"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
SwingWaltz
Gold Star
***
Posts: 5772


« Reply #68 on: May 28, 2010, 01:36:18 AM »

Thank you DSV, appreciate your input!  Smiley

Long road ahead of me, both as a competitor and a teacher.
Logged
QPO
reg mods
Continental Champion
****
Posts: 20818


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #69 on: May 28, 2010, 01:42:53 AM »

the post is never too long, when the information in it is insightful.

Having four different way to explain something reminds me of children...you must have different ways to parent as what works for one does not for the other.sometimes people see this as favoritism but it is not it is about getting the best out of them to be better people and in this case better dances.
Logged

Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!