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Author Topic: Should Amateurs be allowed to teach (and be paid)?  (Read 663 times)
elisedance
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« on: January 12, 2014, 05:46:38 AM »

The arguments for are many - for example how does a promising, but poor, AM couple get the resources to become stars?  And also that many AMs are far better trained and capable than many Pros - especially in places where you do not need a licence to teach.

Arguments against?  Well for starters, what then is the difference between a pro and an am?  Indeed I wonder if we've already reached this point.
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Rugby
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2014, 05:18:02 PM »

The Amateurs that can teach are now almost busier than the Pros due to price and being more available and accomodating.  Many Pros have priced theirselves out of the market.  the mass majority of all instructors do a few group lessons then hang up a shingle (we have a lot of them down this way) or do the 3 month Fred Astaire course then they are set to teach.  Not one teacher have I met in all of Southern Ontario that I have met, and I have met a very large amount, would even be able to compete in Bronze and would barely really be able to do Pre-Bronze.  They have had no formal training, outside of what I have mentioned above.  The best part is that a bunch of them say they are "competition dancers", or had "competed".  When I approach them about it then it comes out that they did a local Fred Astaire competition as a Pro/Am student or went into a fun studio competition.  False advertising not really I suppose but stretching the truth hugely.  I looked into a couple who said they competed in American and International and even went as far as to say they were the American style reps.  When I acted interested man did they lay it on thick.  When I told them I am a Ballroom offical for Ontario and I have never heard of them in either American or International all of a sudden they trained and competed in Quebec.  I asked who they trained with and they ripped off some names from "So You Think You Can Dance Canada".  I told them that I knew them and as a matter of fact I would be seeing them in a week or two and would say hi.  (Hey I can BS with the best of them if I have to)  It was then that they came clean and said that no, they actually didn't train with them or compete in Quebec but they were going to.   Yep, and I hear this a lot.

These are the Pros that are teaching out there whereas we have amateurs that have forgotten more than these people will ever learn and are better than 99.9% of the teachers out there but they cannot teach.  Outside of a handful of cities at best the rest of our country does not have any or only low level instructors so getting our better trained, which you have to be to be able to compete, people out teaching would be a Godsend.  In these areas if you do have a couple that competes then they have to look the other way and not help a struggling Ballroom group or face not being able to compete.  The group loses out and without an instructor then nobody advances and Ballroom does not grow.   
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Rugby
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2014, 05:42:12 PM »

We do allow the finalists at the Canadian Closed teach but this is a farce.  When the competition is held on the east or west coast it is way too expensive for most to go to.  The few couples that get sponsored are fine but the rest face a very expensive trip.  This creates a situation where it is not our best but our more wealthy that go and so the best do not get to qualify to teach but instead the ones that could take the time off work and / or can afford to go now become our finalists even if normally they may be at the bottom.  This was created as a way to try and get along with the Pros who did not want the competition for their bucks.  I say if you are so much better then people will not go to the amateur anyways. 

Our problem is that in Canada we do not have enough good Pros and the few we do group in a few of the bigger cities (and when I say few I mean 5 for the whole country) and will not, nor is it worth their while, leave.  This means in this country Ballroom dancing, especially competition couples, are dying out since we do not have people outside the few big cities that can teach or promote competitiors so we are really only get competitiors from a small pool.  Just so these Pros do not feel threatened by the upper level amateurs we do not allow all but a very few who qualify at the Canadians to teach.  And really, for the few that qualify how many of those are even interested in teaching.  For the second largest country in the world we have a handful of good teachers and no promotion of Ballroom outside of the few bigger cities and we wonder why we are having a problem.  At least by having the certified Open level competitiors teach it will help out to try and train more people, especially if they are outside the big 5.   I have talked to some of the big name teachers in the States and they say that Canada is crazy and losing an opportunity.  They have gotten far more and better students by having their top competitors start students out who then turn them over to the Pros.  The Pros do not waste their time on lower level students and the amateurs charge a cheaper rate so it encourages people to take a chance on Ballroom lessons.   
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2014, 06:06:52 PM »

makes sense to me - but the old school pros see the ams as incompetent and a threat.  This could be resovled if the top ams had to pass a ballroom basics teaching course AND were restricted to teaching to up to syllabus.  If they wanted to teach higher than that well, then go pro.

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Rugby
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2014, 12:56:09 AM »

I agree.  The good thing about the competition ams is they stay current whereas a lot of the old judges do not.
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
elisedance
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2014, 08:48:23 AM »

... but being current doesn't really help with teaching basics Undecided  It might actually hinder.
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

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Rugby
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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2014, 11:51:42 PM »

Yes and I have found that some of our top dancers are not always the best of teachers.
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2014, 10:04:19 AM »

Yes and I have found that some of our top dancers are not always the best of teachers.
That's certainly not new - indeed, its rare when a top-at-anything is also a best-of-teachers;  the problem is that it came easily for them and hence, they never had to struggle with 'fixing it'
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Rugby
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« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2014, 02:09:03 AM »

Many top dancers skipped the syllabus but what they didn't realize is that they were really skipping the understanding and experience that comes along with having gone through the syallbus.  It can become do this because this is what I was told to do rather than do this because I understand what it is that you have to do.  Even worse they teach everyone the same when in reality not everyone learns the same, has the same problem or is built the same.
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2014, 06:20:08 PM »

Or, as said above, they learned syllabus when they were too young to understand or retain it.  Then its automatic for them and they get frustrated and confused why its not also so for everyone.

Well, I think they should try and play a note on a violin to get the picture Grin
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
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