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Author Topic: Foxtrot  (Read 13977 times)
QPO
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« on: April 24, 2009, 07:42:30 AM »

 What is it that makes a great foxtrot? lets discuss the nuance of the dance
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QPO
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« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2009, 10:20:42 AM »

Oh this is my favorite dance and yet to actually do it on the comp floor. I know people say it is the hardest dance to do, but I find it the most satisfying. I love the music and enjoy the challenge of it being slow. As it is actually slower than the Waltz....

What I struggle with in this dance, is in the feather step that my leg stays in front of my partner so I don't look like I am riding his leg! Roll Eyes
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Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
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Some guy
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2009, 02:48:49 PM »

I believe "walking" in Foxtrot helps tremendously.  It forces you to take your center with your partner's (but not away from him).  That way you don't end up straddling his leg.   Smiley

"Walking" when dancing was a challenge for me because it was impossible for me to dance when I simply "walked".  My hips would intrude into our common center and throw my partner off balance.  The trick was to relax and extend our lower backs out behind us, thereby somewhat flattenning out the arch in our lower spine.  That provided enough room between our pelvic bones to allow freedom of movement as a couple. 

Consciously attempting to flatten out the arch in our lower back is dangerous, and I've known of a few dancers who've hurt their backs pretty badly doing this.  So the best method to not dictate to your body how to relax and flatten your lower back.  Instead, make your body do it "naturally". 
A quick way to relax and extend the lower back "naturally" for Standard was taught to me in this way:
1) Walk forwards up and down the ballroom like you normally would.  Be confident and walk with a purpose.
2) Try that same stride again, stay nice and upright, but this time imagine that it's the middle of the night, everyone's asleep in the house, and you're going to the refrigerator and you don't want to wake anyone up.

If you do step 2 with that mental image you'll realize that your steps have gotten softer, your knees and ankles become more sensitive, and most importantly, your lower back extends further backwards to absorb, cushion, and dissipate the impact transmitted through your feet.  The impact never reaches your upper body.  If you use that exact same "natural" body mechanics you'll have the same balance and movement as when you walk, but you'll be smoother and your frame will be unaffected by your actions in the lower body.  You'll also notice that your partner will feel your lead through your "center".

Would love to hear of ways to improve upon this.  ...or if what I just said is completely off base.   Undecided
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cornutt
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« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2009, 07:46:39 PM »


A quick way to relax and extend the lower back "naturally" for Standard was taught to me in this way:
1) Walk forwards up and down the ballroom like you normally would.  Be confident and walk with a purpose.
2) Try that same stride again, stay nice and upright, but this time imagine that it's the middle of the night, everyone's asleep in the house, and you're going to the refrigerator and you don't want to wake anyone up.

This is a great explanation!   Smiley  As for me, there's the old adage: "Foxtrot, the dance that takes a week to learn, and a lifetime to master."  I am so living that right now.   Embarrassed
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Vagabond
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~ Mai Più Senza! ~


« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2009, 09:29:48 PM »

One of our pro's always compares it like "a cat walking" the softness of the feet and alertness of the mind getting the body to move.

The explanation by Some guy is a perfect synonym to that
« Last Edit: April 24, 2009, 10:04:56 PM by QPO » Logged

Dancing with the feet is one thing, but dancing with the heart is another.
QPO
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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2009, 10:07:05 PM »

Yes following on from Vagabonds remark. The Pro says on the dance floor "dance like a cat and not like a dog"... I apply this to all our dancing but particularly in the foxtrot... I LOVE this dance.
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QPO
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« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2009, 10:46:57 AM »

Can someone tell me  in foxtrot, if you are the lady, I sometimes feel I am riding the mans leg...that I am not getting on front for the three in line, am I not taking big enough steps?
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Some guy
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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2009, 11:31:31 AM »

My partner, she used to always try to get coaches to fix her as she felt she was riding my legs too.  Much to my dismay, it turned to be ALL my fault.  Not sure what the specifics of your particular situation is, but the issue my partner had "sounds" the same as yours, verbatim.   

Since ladies are usually good at following a lead, it might be the man's fault in your case too. If he's not moving his center over his feet, you will feel  his legs coming towards you, or in this case, inbetween your legs.  It might be hard for you to move away because his frame will prevent you from pulling away.  If he moves with his center, he'll also end up leading you with it, thereby putting you over your feet.  His frame will move in sync with his body which will give you the freedom you need to move over your feet.   
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2009, 01:14:30 PM »

Since ladies are usually good at following a lead, it might be the man's fault in your case too. If he's not moving his center over his feet, you will feel  his legs coming towards you, or in this case, inbetween your legs.  It might be hard for you to move away because his frame will prevent you from pulling away.  If he moves with his center, he'll also end up leading you with it, thereby putting you over your feet.  His frame will move in sync with his body which will give you the freedom you need to move over your feet.   

I would totally agree with the center idea if it is the man caursing the problem. Sometimes the problem is caursed by the lady going down in her knees. A lady should never go down in her knees or the man will kick her (I used to experience just that) or she will be riding his leg. You need to check with you teacher to find out who is the cause of the problem.
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Edward Teller
Some guy
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« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2009, 04:07:59 PM »

I would totally agree with the center idea if it is the man caursing the problem. Sometimes the problem is caursed by the lady going down in her knees. A lady should never go down in her knees or the man will kick her (I used to experience just that) or she will be riding his leg. You need to check with you teacher to find out who is the cause of the problem.

I was surprised at how long it took my coach to diagnose the problem.  It took him... well, actually he never did diagnose it.  If Dora didn't come along I would still be playing footsie with my partner and wondering why on earth my partner is riding my leg.  As a teacher is it really hard to spot it?  I would think it's fairly easy because I "see" it in other couples all the time now, but that could just be because I've had trouble with that particular issue and I'm more alert to it. 
« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 04:09:38 PM by Some guy » Logged
Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2009, 04:54:25 PM »

I would still be playing footsie with my partner

You are making it sound almost romantic and making me wonder if you really should give up that action.

Quote
As a teacher is it really hard to spot it?  I would think it's fairly easy because I "see" it in other couples all the time now, but that could just be because I've had trouble with that particular issue and I'm more alert to it. 

I don’t think it is difficult to see but I did sit and watch my teacher teach for many years, making me able to see many problems that are not normally seen with the naked eye.
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"As we understand more things, everthing is becoming simpler"

Edward Teller
QPO
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Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2009, 12:58:01 AM »

Since ladies are usually good at following a lead, it might be the man's fault in your case too. If he's not moving his center over his feet, you will feel  his legs coming towards you, or in this case, inbetween your legs.  It might be hard for you to move away because his frame will prevent you from pulling away.  If he moves with his center, he'll also end up leading you with it, thereby putting you over your feet.  His frame will move in sync with his body which will give you the freedom you need to move over your feet.   

I would totally agree with the center idea if it is the man caursing the problem. Sometimes the problem is caursed by the lady going down in her knees. A lady should never go down in her knees or the man will kick her (I used to experience just that) or she will be riding his leg. You need to check with you teacher to find out who is the cause of the problem.

great advice, and I will get the teacher to take a look. We have only been doing it socially lately as in our lessons we re concentrating on waltz and quickstep

so will get him to take a look
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2009, 03:09:48 AM »

What is it that makes a great foxtrot? lets discuss the nuance of the dance
It's yoga/zen-like feeling. The ability to float the dance in long wavy deep breaths with the music only there as ambient connection.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
QPO
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Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2009, 03:29:25 AM »

Ih ave felt that a few times when we dance the foxtrot, that it is light and floaty....non technical terms there....it was such a pleasure to dance it. Soemthing I aspire to each time...
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Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2009, 04:57:37 AM »

If you aspire to it, it will come to you. Always here to help. Good luck.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
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