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Author Topic: Practice -- plentiful or perfect?  (Read 636 times)
phoenix13
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« on: July 08, 2013, 06:00:46 PM »

Which is better?  A short, targeted practice session with perfect technique, or hours and hours of perhaps imperfect drills?  Or do both have a place in your practice repertoire?  Why?
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Dona nobis pacem.
millitiz
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2013, 09:32:58 PM »

How about both perfect and plentiful? Grin
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elisedance
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2013, 09:33:35 PM »

MZ nails it...

NEXT TOPIC EVERYONE!
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The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
phoenix13
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2013, 10:48:13 PM »

Okay.  Then you guys brainstorm for topics while you're working your weekend job and I'll take a break.  Wink


My view is that perfect practice makes perfect.  meaning take the time to learn what you should be practicing and how.  that will help with targeted practice and minimize the time spent reinforcing bad habits.

BUT if you wait until you know how to do it perfectly in order to practice, you'll never practice.  And practice is where muscle memory comes from, where reinforcement of good habits comes from, etc.

I think there needs to be a balance. Cool
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Dona nobis pacem.
elisedance
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2013, 05:04:06 AM »

Okay.  Then you guys brainstorm for topics while you're working your weekend job and I'll take a break.  Wink


My view is that perfect practice makes perfect.  meaning take the time to learn what you should be practicing and how.  that will help with targeted practice and minimize the time spent reinforcing bad habits.

BUT if you wait until you know how to do it perfectly in order to practice, you'll never practice.  And practice is where muscle memory comes from, where reinforcement of good habits comes from, etc.

I think there needs to be a balance. Cool
and one needs to realize that if you practise it wrong, you will have three time the work to fix it - unlearning (which is twice as hard as learning) and then relearning...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
millitiz
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 220


« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2013, 05:23:44 AM »

okok, I meant to reply earlier, then work stuffs got into my way, the next time I notice it, it is 8 hrs later...

I agree with you, p13.

I think it also depends on other variables. For instance, if you have a much higher lesson practice ratio (let's say 4 hrs of practice per 1 hr lesson), you might as well just practice it - even if you are making mistakes (i.e. not perfect), your coach would easily notice them before becoming muscle memories. So in that case, one could "just do it."

To think about it, I guess I'll put myself in "just do it" camp - or so I hope. My take is that - if you don't do anything, you get nowhere. If you do something, you at least would get somewhere, even if you are going on the wrong direction. And even doing bad things might not be a bad thing - some people learn through negative experience, and sometimes, the "wrong way" might be a necessary evil. Even if the "wrong way" would damage your body, assuming that you would take another lesson soon, these damage should be minimal.

Also, it is more realistic. You don't stop at the middle of a competition/social dance just because you make some mistakes. By practicing "just do it," you would hardwire your brain to push your body through difficulties.

From my personal experience, I used to dance at the ratio of 1:20~40 (lesson:practice), and just about everything is reversible.

I just remember a few things - my last partner used to be really mad at me, since I would dance maybe a few bars and stop (because something went wrong). Tongue, ok, maybe I am not really in "just do it" camp, after all.
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phoenix13
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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2013, 05:34:22 AM »

Cool conversation.  Pondering my replies.   Smiley
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Dona nobis pacem.
phoenix13
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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2013, 05:47:49 AM »

Okay.  Just one other thing to throw into the mix, while I'm thinking about what's already been posted.

I think that this is where a good teacher or coach can be invaluable.  They can not only suggest or assign what you should practice, they can also teach you how to practice, so as to minimize reinforcing bad habits.

That's part of the reason why i think it's important to have a high enough level coach that he/she is able to deconstruct dance concepts to its component parts and teach them in a way that students are capable of grasping them.

But, even if you're not yet ready to practice the cutting edge thing you just saw for the first time at today's lesson, I think there's a lot to be said for getting off your duff and practicing something.
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Dona nobis pacem.
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