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| | | |-+  What Makes Coaching Worthwhile?
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Author Topic: What Makes Coaching Worthwhile?  (Read 938 times)
elisedance
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« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2013, 02:28:32 PM »

But as the client you are normally paying him to teach and dance with you.  During coaching you are paying him to dance with you and to lean.
Sounds like a good deal!

Perhaps I should charge my students every time I have to pay to go to a conference and learn the latest in my field too...
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ttd
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« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2013, 02:50:21 PM »

Faulty analogy. Your employer/clients are not your students, it's the university that employs you. The students are the university clients, not yours directly. Should the university dock some of your pay and give it to the students enrolled in your classes as a discount whenever you went to a professional conference/seminar? Would you be OK with that?
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elisedance
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« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2013, 07:03:38 PM »

I think you're avoiding the point: then let me put it differently.

Suppose I'm your piano teacher (self employed) and I pass on a fee to you for me going to Suzuki training? 

I could calculate how many hours I attended the training and split that between the students.  Yes, that is more extreme since the pro is also serving as your partner, but I already acknowledged that there should be a fee for that, just not equal to a lesson.  IMO.
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ttd
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« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2013, 10:39:37 PM »

I think you're avoiding the point: then let me put it differently.

Suppose I'm your piano teacher (self employed) and I pass on a fee to you for me going to Suzuki training? 

I could calculate how many hours I attended the training and split that between the students.  Yes, that is more extreme since the pro is also serving as your partner, but I already acknowledged that there should be a fee for that, just not equal to a lesson.  IMO.
You know, if I were a self-employed teacher of anything, I would have already built price of my ongoing training into my per hour pricing without even telling anyone. Just figured out how much I need to charge per lesson to have the X amount of money left over to get the training I want.
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QPO
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« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2013, 04:23:45 AM »

that would be wise, some though chose to add on. I think we always need to ask upfront and not make assumptions. You can only spend a $ once.
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elisedance
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« Reply #20 on: October 21, 2013, 02:40:36 AM »

I think you're avoiding the point: then let me put it differently.

Suppose I'm your piano teacher (self employed) and I pass on a fee to you for me going to Suzuki training? 

I could calculate how many hours I attended the training and split that between the students.  Yes, that is more extreme since the pro is also serving as your partner, but I already acknowledged that there should be a fee for that, just not equal to a lesson.  IMO.
You know, if I were a self-employed teacher of anything, I would have already built price of my ongoing training into my per hour pricing without even telling anyone. Just figured out how much I need to charge per lesson to have the X amount of money left over to get the training I want.
That's exactly the point!  So why should you be paying the teacher that 'inbuilt price of (their) training' when they are not teaching you but learning themselves?  Indeed, not only that but they are learning while you are paying them so that should be a second reduction. 
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ttd
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« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2013, 12:33:35 PM »

I think you're avoiding the point: then let me put it differently.

Suppose I'm your piano teacher (self employed) and I pass on a fee to you for me going to Suzuki training? 

I could calculate how many hours I attended the training and split that between the students.  Yes, that is more extreme since the pro is also serving as your partner, but I already acknowledged that there should be a fee for that, just not equal to a lesson.  IMO.
You know, if I were a self-employed teacher of anything, I would have already built price of my ongoing training into my per hour pricing without even telling anyone. Just figured out how much I need to charge per lesson to have the X amount of money left over to get the training I want.
That's exactly the point!  So why should you be paying the teacher that 'inbuilt price of (their) training' when they are not teaching you but learning themselves?  Indeed, not only that but they are learning while you are paying them so that should be a second reduction. 
I think we misunderstand each other. There's a difference whether a professional goes to a professional training alone (which is something they have to pay for themselves, and budget for accordingly. And frankly I don't know what Suzuki training is, nor I really care, but the way you put it sounded as if it was a one-on-one thing, or some kind of professional seminar), and when they're there with their student, actively participating in the process (for which they deserve to be paid, IMO). When we have a lesson with a visiting coach, I expect my pro to be able to provide a lot of input to the coach on what it is that he thinks we need to work on and absorb the information so that we can apply it together later, and in general to actively participate in a lesson just as much as he would on our regular lesson. I don't think he owes me a discount for that. YMMV
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2013, 11:54:49 AM »

I think if a coach teaches principles and gives the students homework then it can be of great benefit to have lessons with an outside coach.

DSV
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elisedance
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« Reply #23 on: November 07, 2013, 09:07:35 PM »

Undoubtedly. 
But what do you think of a student having to pay BOTH the outside coach AND their teacher full rate for the lesson?  The coach yes, but the teacher is not teaching.  If it were me I could not charge the same rate simply for partnering.
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QPO
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« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2013, 12:20:21 AM »

I see what you are saying Elise but I think they would argue if they are partnering you then they cannot earn money by teaching another. If the coach only gives you advice  and does not spend any time on the teacher that would make it ok but it is still an expensive exercise  Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: November 16, 2013, 11:59:36 PM by QPO » Logged

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elisedance
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« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2013, 03:06:31 AM »

yes, some fee is fine - but the full rate?
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

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QPO
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« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2013, 09:12:54 PM »

yes, some fee is fine - but the full rate?

well depends on the coach. but they at least should say up front....so you have a choice to have them as a partner or not. not nice to advise after the fact.
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elisedance
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« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2013, 10:07:58 PM »

Since a pro-am coach is also your partner you may not have a lot of choice - or may not feel you have.  I think it should be the norm that a modest hour fee is charged - the same that might be charged if the pro were to dance with you at a party. 

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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
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