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Author Topic: changes in dancesport with time  (Read 990 times)
millitiz
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 220


« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2013, 10:57:20 PM »

"Why would dancesport athletes not continue to evolve beyond what people did 20, 30, 40 years ago?"

Ok, I am slightly confused, didn't you (and I) just agree that competitors evolved from 40, 50 years ago?
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phoenix13
Gold
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Posts: 3359



« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2013, 03:20:09 AM »

Yes, we did.  And I am still agreeing with you, especially about the showdance routines being flashy regardless of era.  Cool Smiley
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Dona nobis pacem.
QPO
Moderator
Continental Champion
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Posts: 20848


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2013, 11:27:50 PM »

All areas of sports be it artistic or not change and rules also change along the way. Often changes happen due to a problem or an accident. So dancing would be no different. I think it is a good thing that things change. The underlying principles are still the same it is the presentation that has change. Richard Gleave introduced more physiological component to the sport/dance.

Thank goodness for change!
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Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35042


ee


« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2013, 04:56:13 AM »

I think ballroom dance has become very resistant to change.  Basically, if you don't do it the way its been codified then you are wrong.  Expression is really limited to emotions not actions.. The danger there is that it will be seen as a dead art form and new creative dancers will go elsewhere.
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
phoenix13
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Posts: 3359



« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2013, 08:42:44 AM »

Must think about this a while before fully answering, BUT ... I think that ee's comment is exactly where there's the most vigorous debate, in a lot of dance forms other than just competitive ballroom.  (Several difference swing dances and AT come to mind.)  There are the purists who think that, at some point in time, the dance reached its peak and should remain in the form, frozen in time.  Then you have the proponents of evolution.

It's amazing how passionate people can be on either side of the argument. Smiley
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Dona nobis pacem.
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35042


ee


« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2013, 04:49:06 AM »


It's amazing how passionate people can be on either side of the argument. Smiley

NO THEY AREN'T


Grin Tongue
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
phoenix13
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Posts: 3359



« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2013, 04:15:33 PM »

That is a very good question. I was thinking about it for quite awhile, but for a different reason.

I was thinking about evolution of dancing, pushing dancing further. At what point is it too much? At what point do we say that, for example, the ballroom dancing that these couples are doing is no longer ballroom?


Just for clarification, M, do you mean ballroom in the layman's sense, or do you mean ballroom as opposed to Latin dances?
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Dona nobis pacem.
millitiz
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 220


« Reply #22 on: June 16, 2013, 07:12:31 PM »

That is a very good question. I was thinking about it for quite awhile, but for a different reason.

I was thinking about evolution of dancing, pushing dancing further. At what point is it too much? At what point do we say that, for example, the ballroom dancing that these couples are doing is no longer ballroom?


Just for clarification, M, do you mean ballroom in the layman's sense, or do you mean ballroom as opposed to Latin dances?

Now it is my turn to be confused...do you mean the difference as ballroom = standard + latin and ballroom = standard? If this was the question, I origianlly meant ballroom = standard, since just about everyone uses it on this forum (though I use the word ballroom as standard + latin). I would like to separate standard and Latin, since to me, they are two genres.
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phoenix13
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Posts: 3359



« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2013, 07:27:18 PM »

No. You understood. That's exactly what I was asking. 

When you say ballroom,you mean standard - waltz, foxtrot, tango, Viennese waltz, quickstep.  Same as at Blackpool.

Now I understand and can better answer your question.  Very cool.  Smiley


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Dona nobis pacem.
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