partnerdanceonline.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 03, 2015, 04:39:34 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
A lot of people are visiting Smiley Smiley
Undecided Undecided but not many are posting....
please say hi Cheesy
116988 Posts in 1875 Topics by 226 Members
Latest Member: Dance20Grit
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  partnerdanceonline.com
|-+  Partner Dancing
| |-+  Partner Dances
| | |-+  Ballroom dance -advanced (Moderators: Rugby, cornutt)
| | | |-+  Floor contact
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Print
Author Topic: Floor contact  (Read 2005 times)
sandralw
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 93



WWW
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2015, 11:46:43 AM »

I think it needs to be more specificly broken down as to whether you are asking about your standing leg or your swinging leg and whether you are dealing with pendulum swing or metronomic swing.  Each is different in relationship to the floor and in the use of ones self and how and when the weight of the body travels in, through and out of the standing foot.  Also, it will again be different when it is a traveling step versus a rotational step.
Logged
QPO
reg mods
Continental Champion
****
Posts: 20983


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2015, 07:29:19 PM »

I think it needs to be more specificly broken down as to whether you are asking about your standing leg or your swinging leg and whether you are dealing with pendulum swing or metronomic swing.  Each is different in relationship to the floor and in the use of ones self and how and when the weight of the body travels in, through and out of the standing foot.  Also, it will again be different when it is a travelling step versus a rotational step.

yes I can visualise that so ineffect the turn should be effected by the correct use of hip rotation, rather than using the other joints first as what I see a lot of people doing.
Logged

Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
sandralw
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 93



WWW
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2015, 08:14:03 PM »

Picture it this way:  stand vertically with your arms, at  your sides.  Raise your arms to hold height, straight out away from you.  Now, pretend you are standing on a turntable and you are revolving. 

Your spine is the center of the rotation and all of your blocks of weight are aligned.  From underneath your arm coming straight out from your sides is a pane of glass at each side.  If you maintain your verticality and all of your blocks of weight remain properly placed you are now a revolving door.

You can not allow the panes of glass to shatter (there are horizontal panes of glass also, but these are the ones we are dealing with for now) and as you rotate you must maintain this revolving door imagery throughout your body. 

It does not mean that you are as stiff as a board, but you do not want to step too far away from having a foot under your body so that that foot is able to properly catch and support your body weight.

The impetus to create the rotation comes from the hip or the hip in connection to and in relation to the shoulder, depending upon the action being attempted.

Hope this helps.
Logged
sandralw
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 93



WWW
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2015, 08:55:14 PM »

We used to call it "Caressing" the floor in the swing dances.  The creation of swing-turn-sway never loosing true contact with the floor allowed the faint brushing or caressing while traveling from foot to foot over the surface of the floor.
I like that but perhaps I think the contact is a bit more earthy than a caress, its almost as if you momentarily sink into the floor!

Maybe caressing isn't quite the right term for it, though that's how I feel with my free foot moving across the floor... A light caress or brushing very lightly so as to not loose contact with the flor and have to look for it under my foot whe. I want to actually transfer the weight onto it.

As to the foot remaining in contact with the floor while still having my weight on it, I feel that I am working through the floor and almost pushing it away from me or pulling it in towards me.  I used to also feel this way when I skated.  Maybe that's why it feels like this to me.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.12 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!