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Author Topic: Samba  (Read 10432 times)
ZPomeroy
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Victoria, Australia


« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2009, 09:47:52 PM »

I thought i might revive this topic as samba is one of the hardest latin dances yet we have had not discussion on technical aspects Huh There are two main aspects that i think we can talk about: firstly how to achieve a continuous body rhythm and pelvic action and how this rhythm is actually produced. Secondly how do we find that balance between progression of the movement and a 'drop' that is needed in the action to create power.

Zac
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Dance is poetry written for the feet, read by the heart, and destined for the soul.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2009, 10:57:17 PM »

and on this topic I am, as they say, all ears!
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TangoDancer
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Posts: 736



« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2009, 03:21:40 AM »

Samba is, indeed, one of the most difficult dances, and, again, one of the most misunderstood. To get into it gently... that is to say, not all at once, here are, IMO, the must haves (it took me about 3 years, including a small habitation in the Carib, to get my samba where I wanted it).....

1. know that the action is more that of salsa based dances than the rumba based dances (mambo, cha, etc)
2. it will not work w/o a proper contraction of the abs and roll of the core; contraction-roll is essential
3. the drive is 'all' feet/ankles first, then through the body via #2
4. the front half of the rhythm differs from the back half
5. there is NO bounce in samba

I am certain that this is to be a good discussion. I like the dance very much; understand the difference between carioca and carib; understand the music, and understand, after much tribulation, the kinesthetics... but, it took a loonngg while.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2009, 06:27:50 AM »

Hmm. Soooo, it wasn't just walking? Roll Eyes
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
pinkstuff
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Posts: 280


« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2009, 06:37:29 AM »

Compared to the Cha Cha, the Samba is a cakewalk.

Samba has a very fluid action - once you've got the pieces of the jigsaw, it feels relatively natural to do. The Cha is entirely unnatural and uncomfortable, and physically more draining than any other dance.

Too true - I love samba.  It helped when I stopped trying to do what I was told to and just did it and enjoyed myself.  Chacha is another kettle of fish.  The less said the better.
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pinkstuff
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« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2009, 06:42:28 AM »

On another note - Arms.  What to do with them?  Have been told to start experimenting and see what I like (this goes for all latin dances) to do with my arms when dancing but not really finding myself inspired...they either look too fast/too slow/silly or false and am not really sure what direction to go with this - does anyone have any suggestions/ideas on how to go about this?  Am currently hoping I will be inspired on the spot!!!

(PS feel free to move to another more appropriate place, just here as it started off with Samba arms  Smiley
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2009, 09:01:18 AM »

I think Samba arms are particularly significant.  It really helps to watch the pros do it - and I think they use ballet method.  I'm certainly no pro on this but the arm becomes like a wave ripple. First and formost it is relaxed and then the movement induced in the upper arm works its way down to the finger tips.

And I will be very happy if someone contradicts the above neophyte shot!
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
MusicChica
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« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2009, 01:11:55 PM »

Well, the first thing to remember is that arm movement does not originate in the arms--it originates in the body.  The "ripple effect" EE mentioned isn't a bad way to put it; it starts from your core, moves up through your ribs, and out through your arms.  That should give you a better idea of what to do with your arms, and there's one other little thing that's helped me when it comes to arm-specific movement.  No matter what you do with your arms, the movement does not originate at the shoulder or upper arm--it's the shoulder blade that should initiate any kind of movement.  That might also help your arms feel more natural.

Let me know if that helps!
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2009, 05:43:40 AM »

That the arm movement originates in the core is correct (much like how the arms move when one is simply walking). It is this that allows us to say to simply allow the arms to move naturally. Of course, in dance, we wish to exagerate this movement a little. Chica's post is good, yet we need to remember, also, to finish. We do this by maintaining tone through the arms and into the hands and fingertips. I tell dancers to dance the hands... the arms will follow.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
MusicChica
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Posts: 1325


« Reply #24 on: December 01, 2009, 12:30:40 PM »

D'oh!  *headslap*  Of course, TD.  I knew that, and didn't even think to include it.  Yeah, the proper order for movement through the arms is something like this, according to what I've been taught: shoulder blade --> shoulder --> upper arm --> elbow --> forearm --> wrist --> hand --> fingers
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pinkstuff
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« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2009, 04:18:55 PM »

Yep - been taught pretty much the same, esp maintianing tone and dancing to the fingers.  I just don't seem to get 'where' to aim/put them. if that makes sense. (or I'm just not used to the sensation)  Roll Eyes
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TangoDancer
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Posts: 736



« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2009, 12:54:26 AM »

As a general rule, the wrists should never be below the shoulder, or above the top of the head. One should use placements above the head only in 'stop' moves. As you probably know, keep the palms facing downward at the exhaustion of the movements.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2009, 04:35:31 AM »

Interesting on the wrist placement - also the case, I suppose when making bows etc... ?
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
TangoDancer
Open Bronze
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Posts: 736



« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2009, 05:26:09 AM »

You mean like hair bows, or Christmas bows, and such?   Smiley


OK, just kidding.    Wink
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
cdnsalsanut
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Posts: 256



« Reply #29 on: January 09, 2010, 07:27:32 PM »

This is the last dance I started learning and I've been at it about three months.

I do find it the hardest dance. I really didn't have too much trouble in the other dances, not that I do them well, but over time they have come into focus for me, an insight here and there through teachers and exercises, but samba...I just don't feel or look like I've got it.

I see people practicing in the studio and they look like they have it. Nice long lines, that sense of bounce or dancing in the toes, that contracting of the abs and rolling onto the foot motion I was taught...but, after much ongoing practice of my front and back basics, bota fota's and volta's I still look and feel like an absolute beginner.

So...any suggestions as to technique or how to do the basic steps would be appreciated. I've watched Shirly Ballas demonstrate technique on her dvd but, sorry Shirly, still doesn't look good when I do it.

And social dancing samba, that's another story.  I need to learn I really simple routine I can dance with ladies socially. Any suggestions?

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"There are short-cuts to happiness, and dancing is one of them."
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