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Author Topic: Foot and Ankle Exercises?  (Read 4299 times)
Some guy
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« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2011, 07:52:13 PM »

This question is really for anyone, but since SG and DSV both mentioned this, it made me wonder - could relaxing your ankles/heels also help with balance?

I would like to add that you can relax them provided you don't push off the floor or use your feet the wrong way.  Basically what I mean by "relax" is to let go of control and give your body the freedom to use them as necessary. 
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2011, 05:02:42 PM »

DSV, that sounds like a great exercise too! I think I will add it to my list!

This question is really for anyone, but since SG and DSV both mentioned this, it made me wonder - could relaxing your ankles/heels also help with balance?

Yes, absolutely....you will gain a better balance when you relax your feet and ankles. You will actually find that your feet will open up and become more like “duck feet” which creates a bigger surface to the floor. When you have a bigger surface touching the floor you will have better balance.

DSV
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Edward Teller
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« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2011, 08:20:17 AM »

duckfeet is interesting concept....do you use this in motion as well? and if so in which step would that apply?
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Some guy
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« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2011, 10:45:42 AM »

duckfeet is interesting concept....do you use this in motion as well? and if so in which step would that apply?
I'm pretty sure it applies to any step that makes contact with the floor.
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QPO
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« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2011, 08:23:42 PM »

duckfeet is interesting concept....do you use this in motion as well? and if so in which step would that apply?
I'm pretty sure it applies to any step that makes contact with the floor.

is that in passing between steps as I would imagine that you have to bring your feet together when brushing, I am a visual person is there a youtube example that you could show me..... Roll Eyes
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elisedance
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« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2011, 01:45:01 AM »

duckfeet is interesting concept....do you use this in motion as well? and if so in which step would that apply?
I'm pretty sure it applies to any step that makes contact with the floor.

is that in passing between steps as I would imagine that you have to bring your feet together when brushing, I am a visual person is there a youtube example that you could show me..... Roll Eyes

You have to read a bit higher in the topic Q - they are referring to the foot making a large contact area with the floor, a sensation achieved by relaxation...
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samina
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« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2011, 03:46:34 PM »

fwiw, i like using stairs for strengthening feet & ankles. has helped me a lot
could relaxing your ankles/heels also help with balance?
i noticed having my feet & ankles worked on during rolfing improved balance considerably. strengthening the inner leg line helps too...
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Dora-Satya Veda
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« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2011, 04:58:52 PM »

duckfeet is interesting concept....do you use this in motion as well? and if so in which step would that apply?
I'm pretty sure it applies to any step that makes contact with the floor.

Correct!

DSV
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« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2011, 08:45:40 PM »

fwiw, i like using stairs for strengthening feet & ankles. has helped me a lot
could relaxing your ankles/heels also help with balance?
i noticed having my feet & ankles worked on during rolfing improved balance considerably. strengthening the inner leg line helps too...

that is what I am working on at the moment. my knee has been strapped for nearly four weeks and I can feel i=the inner musciles starting to work again which is helping the inner leg line. Grin
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samina
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« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2011, 09:04:40 AM »

Hah..."duck feet", good image. I usually describe my own feet as having become like "lion paws" in the course of my evolution as a dancer. They weren't like that before, but they engage with the floor so differently now.

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sandralw
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« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2015, 09:54:56 PM »

With all of my beginner students I find the same problem... They have no idea how to simply walk.  This is primarily because of bad habits and lack of leg and especially foot strength.  The concept of rolling the foot on and off the floor by articulating the feet through control of the body weight over the foot is a totally foreign concept.  I begin with having them stand on a stair with the ball of the foot and toes spread.  Drop the heel well below the stair level and the rising to the toes upward.  This is done slowly in small repetitions and then longer until they can do it one foot at a time, well balanced and without wobbling.  This is also done slowly.... Upwards and downwards.  Both men and ladies.  A really good warm up also.
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QPO
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« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2015, 03:15:34 AM »

With all of my beginner students I find the same problem... They have no idea how to simply walk.  This is primarily because of bad habits and lack of leg and especially foot strength.  The concept of rolling the foot on and off the floor by articulating the feet through control of the body weight over the foot is a totally foreign concept.  I begin with having them stand on a stair with the ball of the foot and toes spread.  Drop the heel well below the stair level and the rising to the toes upward.  This is done slowly in small repetitions and then longer until they can do it one foot at a time, well balanced and without wobbling.  This is also done slowly.... Upwards and downwards.  Both men and ladies.  A really good warm up also.

excellent advice.. I hate it when I was told put more weight into the floor what does that mean and how do you know if you achieved it. :-/
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sandralw
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« Reply #27 on: May 15, 2015, 11:19:08 AM »

More weight into the floor... I understand the phrase, but difficult to articulate the answer as it is a sensory awareness... As a skater I had to learn to drop my weight into the floor for a good connection into the floor on Roller, or into the ice.  It took time to become aware of the skating surface under my foot.  It helped me greatly transferring this onto the dance floor at the time (I was a kid at the time) ...

It is basically where you create your center of gravity I personally feel.

Some people carry it too high, up at their sternum.  It belongs about 2-3 fiber widths above and below the belly button.  The task of finding it and connecting to your partner with it is easiest using mental imagery. 

A good exercise is to stand, eyes close hand to hand with your partner both facing each other, feet slightly apart.  Do not make yourself move, but think yourself to transfer your weight from one foot to the other through your use of your center.  Aback and forth, back and forth, left foor to right foot.  Not as an active transfer, but a passive one.  When your partner can feel and follow this transference you know that you have just dropped your weight into the floor.

Still difficult to speak in words what I give as an exercise to my students over the course of a lesson in a few sentences on a piece of paper. It comes through the floor, up the leg, through the center, down the other leg, into the floor and the turns around and goes back again. 

This is what is called "Being well grounded."

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Some guy
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« Reply #28 on: May 15, 2015, 11:52:13 AM »

It is basically where you create your center of gravity I personally feel.

Some people carry it too high, up at their sternum.  It belongs about 2-3 fiber widths above and below the belly button.  The task of finding it and connecting to your partner with it is easiest using mental imagery.  

Yep! Then comes the confusion between center of gravity and the active centers!  Cheesy  Women carry their center of gravity around the hips, and men carry it around the rib-cage.  The structural development difference gives that away.

I think putting, "more weight into the floor", is a band-aid to fix something else that is seriously wrong somewhere else.  Most teachers have no idea what's causing it, so they tell you to apply foot pressure and all sorts of horrible things that'll damage your feet, make you lose toenails, give you bone spurs, bunions, whatnots.

If you hear, "more weight into the floor", or anything of that sort, run away: this teacher can recognize pieces of the puzzle, but has no idea how to fit them together.  This could end up damaging your body, sometimes irreparably, or worse: make your dancing feel bad!  Tongue
« Last Edit: May 15, 2015, 12:01:24 PM by Some guy » Logged
sandralw
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« Reply #29 on: May 15, 2015, 06:33:08 PM »

That is why I was so lucky when Bill Irvine introduced me to the Alexander Technique.  It was the best thing that ever happened.  It saved my body.  Also the book "The Thinking Body" by Mabel Todd. 
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