partnerdanceonline.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 24, 2014, 05:36:00 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
A lot of people are visiting Smiley Smiley
Undecided Undecided but not many are posting....
please say hi Cheesy
116470 Posts in 1856 Topics by 221 Members
Latest Member: EVE_Dance
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  partnerdanceonline.com
|-+  Partner Dancing
| |-+  Dancesport
| | |-+  Amateur (Moderators: Rugby, ZPomeroy)
| | | |-+  Amateur Competitions
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Print
Author Topic: Amateur Competitions  (Read 2144 times)
dancinginthemoonlight
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 44


« on: October 31, 2011, 12:55:11 PM »

When I previously competed, I only competed at college competitions (mainly due to the fact that I was actually in college and that was the easiest way for me to be able to compete). I've been a spectator of college, pro-am and pro competitions but never of amateur competitions that weren't full of college competitors. Because I am now, technically, not allowed to compete at collegiate competitions anymore, I would like to do amateur competitions.

So, for the amateur competitors, I have a couple of questions. I often noticed that at college competitions (especially the larger ones) you had a lot of people who would "dance down", meaning that, for example, you would have a gold level couple competing in a silver level category so that they had a better chance of winning. This was of course, looked down upon but that didn't stop people from doing it. Occasionally the judges would out them, but that really didn't happen too often. Is this something that comes up a lot in amateur competitions as well or do you feel that the levels are more "true" as in more gold dancers stay in the gold category than in the silver (or whichever level they compete at, that was just an example).

Also, do you find that it is "expensive" to compete as an amateur? I am wondering mostly about the entry fees although I understand that there are a lot of other costs associated with an actual competition (such as costumes, transportation, lodging, food, lessons, etc.). And how often do you typically go to a competition? A couple times a year? A couple times a month?
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2011, 01:27:27 PM »

If a couple is competing 'out of catagory' they should be reported and their results will not count.  However, be careful. You ARE allowed to 'dance up' so (at least in Canada) if you dance at silver you can also dance in gold etc.  The rule is, however, that you MUST do your own level if it is offered.  So just check if the couple you think are dancing down are actually dancing up Smiley
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2011, 01:31:11 PM »

Expenses vary a lot.  The way to make it cheap is to do pro-am first Shocked Shocked That is VERY expensive as you have to pay not only for yourself but also the travel/hotel/fees of your pro AND the entry costs are higher.  After doing that for a while the costs of AM seem trivial Smiley

Still, I don't mean to be flippant and realize they are significant if you are on a limited budget.  The big savings with AM competition is that you split the costs of lessons and you get to practise for next to nothing (neither of which are the case for pro-am BTW). 

We did compete about 1/month but have cut it down by about a half.  I think its important ot do a lot of competitions early so that you get used to it - much depends on your and your partners competition nerves (mine were awful and now are only bad).  You don't really want to just to out for the national championships without having tasted what life is like Out There Smiley
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Some guy
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1464


« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2011, 03:33:46 PM »

Ditto to what ee said.  "That's what She said!".   Roll Eyes
Logged
Some guy
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1464


« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2011, 03:34:37 PM »

The only field that's probably not messed up with people dancing out of category is the Professional category.
Logged
dancinginthemoonlight
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 44


« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2011, 09:38:25 PM »

If a couple is competing 'out of catagory' they should be reported and their results will not count.  However, be careful. You ARE allowed to 'dance up' so (at least in Canada) if you dance at silver you can also dance in gold etc.  The rule is, however, that you MUST do your own level if it is offered.  So just check if the couple you think are dancing down are actually dancing up Smiley

We are also allowed to dance up and maybe that is the problem. Maybe instead of the gold dancers dancing in the silver category the bronze dancers are trying to dance silver therefore making the true silver competitors look like they are at a higher level and maybe a bit out of place Wink hmm...
Logged
dancinginthemoonlight
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 44


« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2011, 09:41:42 PM »

The only field that's probably not messed up with people dancing out of category is the Professional category.

I have seen some pretty questionable "professionals". lol Though I suspect that is probably more evident at smaller/lesser known competitions.
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2011, 10:20:24 PM »

If a couple is competing 'out of catagory' they should be reported and their results will not count.  However, be careful. You ARE allowed to 'dance up' so (at least in Canada) if you dance at silver you can also dance in gold etc.  The rule is, however, that you MUST do your own level if it is offered.  So just check if the couple you think are dancing down are actually dancing up Smiley

We are also allowed to dance up and maybe that is the problem. Maybe instead of the gold dancers dancing in the silver category the bronze dancers are trying to dance silver therefore making the true silver competitors look like they are at a higher level and maybe a bit out of place Wink hmm...

I think its good for everyone - it means you can get more floor time at a comp - after all, much of the expense is getting there so why not dance more?  the dancers already in the catagory will (on average) look better so thats good for them too.
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
ttd
Open Bronze
*
Posts: 642


« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2011, 01:23:41 PM »

Because I am now, technically, not allowed to compete at collegiate competitions anymore, I would like to do amateur competitions.
Then obviously you need to find a partner who can do them with you.
Logged
dancinginthemoonlight
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 44


« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2011, 01:18:23 PM »

I do have a partner who can do them with me, but we both come from a college competition background. My partner before him had only done pro-am competitions (We were supposed to compete in amateur, but things did not work out.).

I just wanted to see from people who competed in amateur if there were any major differences between competing with only college students/teams and competing against people who maybe take it more seriously (Also, I'm not trying to sound offensive or anything, I just find that in my experience, most college students compete as a hobby and don't plan on doing it after college, that is all.).
Logged
Some guy
Intermediate Silver
*
Posts: 1464


« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2011, 02:47:34 PM »

I just wanted to see from people who competed in amateur if there were any major differences between competing with only college students/teams and competing against people who maybe take it more seriously

I think amateur competitions can be a little more cut throat than collegiate comps.
Logged
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2011, 03:48:53 PM »

I just wanted to see from people who competed in amateur if there were any major differences between competing with only college students/teams and competing against people who maybe take it more seriously

I think amateur competitions can be a little more cut throat than collegiate comps.

And vice versa - depends on the college I think Wink 

Also on age.  The youngsters are out to establish dance careers, he aging set just a mantlepiece trophy...
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
dancinginthemoonlight
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 44


« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2011, 11:03:38 AM »

Yes, I wish my college team would have been more competitive!  Sad
Logged
phoenix13
Gold
***
Posts: 3359



« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2013, 05:38:36 PM »

Don't know if DITM is still around.

Still a good topic though.  Not sure why but I was under the impression that a lot of collegiate comps allow other amateur competitors.  That's not true?
Logged

Dona nobis pacem.
elisedance
Administrator
Blackpool Finalist
*****
Posts: 35013


ee


« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2013, 08:34:53 PM »

Don't know if DITM is still around.

Still a good topic though.  Not sure why but I was under the impression that a lot of collegiate comps allow other amateur competitors.  That's not true?
That was the case at the University of Md - they encouraged 'adult' AM competitors to join in.  It was a LOT of fun and the students treated you like a star!
Logged

If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Pages: [1] 2 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!