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Author Topic: Qualifications of your pro  (Read 1627 times)
dream a little dream
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« on: April 21, 2009, 09:42:46 AM »

I'm not exactly sure how to word this, but here goes.....

In selecting a pro, what do you look for beside the obvious (winning competitions, successful students)?  How can you tell if a pro has a good background with good information to teach? 
If switching pros, how do you select a new one? 

I am moving from a pro who's technical information is good and who is constantly learning more and would like to ensure that the next pro has good technical information to impart. 
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emeralddancer
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« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2009, 09:44:55 AM »

Good question.

One of the things I did not do was "what to look for in a pro"

When I searched it was about the studio. Never thought about the pro. LOL

So I look forward to seeing some of the answers
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dream a little dream
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« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2009, 09:46:44 AM »

Good question.

One of the things I did not do was "what to look for in a pro"

When I searched it was about the studio. Never thought about the pro. LOL

So I look forward to seeing some of the answers

Before I went to my former studio, I researched the qualifications of the owners (memberships to organizations, etc.).  It seemed like a good more at the time.  But, I am finding now that that might not be the end all and be all, which is why I posted this!
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pruthe
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« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2009, 11:58:42 AM »

...  How can you tell if a pro has a good background with good information to teach?  ...

I think having some "tryout" lessons would be a good way to get a feel for qualifications, ability and compatibility of a teacher. Maybe ask some "good" questions and see how teacher responds or explains how to do. Also, might be good idea to ask who were main teachers of this teacher. If main teachers are well known and you like their style of dance, perhaps this teacher would be a good choice. Ask around to see what other knowledgeable people think. Good luck in your search. :-)
« Last Edit: April 21, 2009, 12:00:56 PM by pruthe » Logged

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malakawa
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« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2009, 01:10:07 PM »

...  How can you tell if a pro has a good background with good information to teach?  ...

I think having some "tryout" lessons would be a good way to get a feel for qualifications, ability and compatibility of a teacher. Maybe ask some "good" questions and see how teacher responds or explains how to do. Also, might be good idea to ask who were main teachers of this teacher. If main teachers are well known and you like their style of dance, perhaps this teacher would be a good choice. Ask around to see what other knowledgeable people think. Good luck in your search. :-)

i agree about having some tryouts with the teacher. most of the studios offer a free lesson.

don't just look at them as a pro dancers. because they can make you uncomfortable.

i can say from my experience that 3 students in my studio don't feel comfortable with my style of teaching, because i am asking a lot and I don't give compliments so easily.

yet, other students don't want to have lessons with a beginner teacher.  Wink

for me as a dancer, i will not go to a teacher/coach who will tell me how good I am. I am going to a teacher who will tell me how bad I am and who will teach me more.
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Becky!
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2009, 04:02:59 PM »

For me, I have picked all of my teachers because I see something in their own style of dancing that I like and admire.

It has never turned out to be a bad choice.
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SwingWaltz
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« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2009, 10:12:01 AM »

I pick my coach for something in their dancing I admire, their teaching style and their personality too!
How many comps they won doesn't matter as much to me!


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Medira
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« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2009, 11:57:18 AM »

Because I used to travel for work all the time, I would find at least one new instructor for every city/area I was in.  Since I would usually only be around for three or four months, occasionally longer, I didn't have a lot of time to audition.  What I ended up doing was asking friends who were local for recommendations.  Then, as I built up my network of pros, I would also ask them for recommendations of people to work with for whatever city I was in.  Since they had had the opportunity to get to know me, my personality and how I learn, they have always been spot on in their recommendations.
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skipper
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« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2009, 05:12:08 PM »

It all depends on your goals. A master teacher may not always have had the competitive results. That does not make them any less of a teacher. Some world champions can dance beautifully---but they cannot tell you or teach you how to do it.

Learning is also a layering process. What you need on  your first 5 lessons vs the information you need after 7 years and 35 competins is completly different.

Find someone that can explain things to you and that you look forward to seeing.
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Medira
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« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2009, 06:43:25 PM »

Find someone that can explain things to you and that you look forward to seeing.
This is what I look for. Smiley
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People can be divided into three classes: the few who make things happen, the many who watch things happen and the overwhelming majority who have no idea what has happened - Warren Miller's "Off The Grid"
elisedance
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« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2009, 10:18:58 PM »

Find someone that can explain things to you and that you look forward to seeing.

Thats great advice - but perhaps more for the experienced dancer.  The fact is that ALL teachers have something to teach, the trouble is that some of it is not worh learning even if they can explain it beautifully.

I think the first step to finding a good teacher is to hang out where the competition couples are and talk to them.  My experience has been that they are very friendly and always want to help.  From them you can get a list of possible teachers - ones that know their stuff and THEN follow the advice above.  The amazing thing is that excellent lessons from a private coach are often cheaper than lousy ones from a 'journeyman' teacher.
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Rugby
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« Reply #11 on: April 29, 2009, 10:40:10 PM »

Quote
Thats great advice - but perhaps more for the experienced dancer.  The fact is that ALL teachers have something to teach, the trouble is that some of it is not worh learning even if they can explain it beautifully.

I think the first step to finding a good teacher is to hang out where the competition couples are and talk to them.  My experience has been that they are very friendly and always want to help.  From them you can get a list of possible teachers - ones that know their stuff and THEN follow the advice above.  The amazing thing is that excellent lessons from a private coach are often cheaper than lousy ones from a 'journeyman' teacher.

I wish we had done this.  We went down a few bad trails that cost us at least 3 years before we started to get on track.

« Last Edit: April 30, 2009, 06:07:15 AM by elisedance » Logged

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QPO
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« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2009, 05:56:29 AM »

I pick my coach for something in their dancing I admire, their teaching style and their personality too!
How many comps they won doesn't matter as much to me!




I agree with this. but It is nice to know they they walk the talk so to speak. I have had coaches that may explain something but cant do what they teach you and I don't think that is good.
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SwingWaltz
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« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2009, 01:01:50 PM »

Just found out that my coach has a masters degree in some kind of art. LoL
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elisedance
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« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2009, 02:44:20 PM »

my first dance teacher had a PhD in nuclear physics...
a nerd's nerd Smiley
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