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Author Topic: Teaching - a good way to learn something?  (Read 1983 times)
ttd
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« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2011, 09:57:56 AM »

Just an update. I bribed my son into being a guinea pig. Literally, with $$. It was an interesting experience, although his attention span isn't the greatest in the world and he is a lot more responsive to latin dances (from his pov waltz belongs somewhere in 19th century, and it should stay there). But I tried to teach him some basics in different dances. At least it put me in position where I had to think a lot more about the guy's part.
Does this need its own topic - getting your child to dance?

that is an interesting one. I know families where the children do and where we teach their children have no interest in it at all. they did do it but have now given it up, I do hope that they will come back to it. Not sure how to have children love it they either will or the wont there is nothing inbetween
Keep in mind that it depends on the child's age and personality, too. In my case, we're talking about a headstrong 16 year old male. I got him some lessons when he was younger, like 10, he did it for a bit and then stopped, because he decided he wanted to play drums (his goal was to play a drum set in his school jazz band). He mainly did swing and chacha back then and he seems to remember a lot of chacha, and this time around he was much more responsive to corrections (maybe also because he wanted that extra cash badly enough, and I told him that if he is not going to be a good guinea pig and won't do what needs to be done, I will find someone else who will). A dance friend of mine has a 14 year old son, he also took some lessons (he started when he was around 8 ), and she even found some partners for him, and they competed a few times in our local events. But he didn't like his last (and best, but bossy) partner, so he quit. That was a couple of years ago. He would still dance at parties with his mom, but it seems to be done more to appease her than because he wants to do it (he has more mellow personality compared to my kid, too). Another local pro told me that his son started learning some latin, but he didn't like his partner, so he quit when he was 13 or so. Then yet another family that I met at a competition - their daughter (12-13 - don't remember) competes pro-am because they couldn't find a youth partner for her and she really wanted to do ballroom. IMV, it's harder to get boys to do it.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2011, 10:10:09 AM by ttd » Logged
QPO
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« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2012, 07:41:43 AM »

I have over the last few weeks being doing alot more assisting teaching and today I had my first lesson in learning the waltz and do the mans part. It certainly was different. I found it quite empowering for some reason. Not sure why....but will I be a better dancer for learning both the mans and womens part and will it become easy to move between the mans steps and womens?

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elisedance
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« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2012, 03:38:21 PM »

I have over the last few weeks being doing alot more assisting teaching and today I had my first lesson in learning the waltz and do the mans part. It certainly was different. I found it quite empowering for some reason. Not sure why....but will I be a better dancer for learning both the mans and womens part and will it become easy to move between the mans steps and womens?



Not sure - it may make your disagreements more colourful!  In particular if you remember what he is supposed to do better than he can.  Of course the opposite is generally assumed, that the man knows the woman's part better than she does Tongue Tongue  (OK I'm a bit overboard on that - but I've certainly heard it that way far more often than the opposite..)
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« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2012, 08:17:27 PM »

well at the moment I feel that you need to keep everything open and there is a lot to learn...but it is a start and preparing me for a life after compeition dancing.
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Some guy
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« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2012, 10:37:38 AM »

Not sure - it may make your disagreements more colourful!  In particular if you remember what he is supposed to do better than he can.  Of course the opposite is generally assumed, that the man knows the woman's part better than she does Tongue Tongue  (OK I'm a bit overboard on that - but I've certainly heard it that way far more often than the opposite..)
I would say that the man kind of HAS TO know the women's part, 'cause he's getting the woman to do precisely what he wants her to do, and he has to FOLLOW the lady. 
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skipper
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« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2012, 11:42:50 AM »

There are 3 ways or kinds of learners. When you can figure out HOW the person learns, it is helpful.

Audio learners
Visual learners
Kinetic learners

Audio learns by listening (thinks about it) and does
Visual learners watch and do
Kinetic learners learn by feel ( think this is hardest because feeling change as you layer new things)

Just an idea ....
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elisedance
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« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2012, 12:12:42 PM »

Not sure - it may make your disagreements more colourful!  In particular if you remember what he is supposed to do better than he can.  Of course the opposite is generally assumed, that the man knows the woman's part better than she does Tongue Tongue  (OK I'm a bit overboard on that - but I've certainly heard it that way far more often than the opposite..)
I would say that the man kind of HAS TO know the women's part, 'cause he's getting the woman to do precisely what he wants her to do, and he has to FOLLOW the lady. 
He may know the womans part, but I don't think he has to know how exactly to do it Wink  Its not quite the same....
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elisedance
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« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2012, 12:14:07 PM »

There are 3 ways or kinds of learners. When you can figure out HOW the person learns, it is helpful.

Audio learners
Visual learners
Kinetic learners

Audio learns by listening (thinks about it) and does
Visual learners watch and do
Kinetic learners learn by feel ( think this is hardest because feeling change as you layer new things)

Just an idea ....

this is SO important.  Let me stress SO SO SO important - I think we even have a topic on it somewhere.  The other name for kinetic is kinesthenic (I know cause thats me).  I only learn when I do, I'm rather poor at aural or visual learning...
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phoenix13
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« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2013, 10:50:38 AM »

Interesting topic.

Leaving aside the question of actually teaching someone, I would suggest that, in order to prepare to teach well,one has to be able to understand the concepts down to a fundamental level -- well enough to present them to someone else.  I think that might be what the dance pro in question was getting at.  To teach something,you have to explain it. To be able to explain it,you have to understand it. 
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« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2013, 11:29:32 PM »

I agree, and it depend on the level of complexity... If you are teaching social dancers how much information do you give them. One has to understand the road map before you start finessing things.

I am happy to assist people with that. but if they are able to dance better I am uncomfortable in providing detailed instruction.....Posture, holding frame.

but until I pass my Level 1 exam which is the highest I can go as an "am" person i will not offer any one advice.
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phoenix13
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« Reply #25 on: May 08, 2013, 01:56:12 AM »

Even if they ask?
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« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2013, 08:49:39 AM »

Even if they ask?

hmmm that would be difficult, depends on how well I know them and if what I have to say would add value to their dancing. We have a couple here that are at a lower level and he thinks he knows more than he does, but I am sure if he asked for advice he would still question it...

I have a friend interstate that has asked me and I have offered her advice and she was comfortable with what I gave her.

I would have to think carefully before doing so.
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phoenix13
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« Reply #27 on: May 08, 2013, 09:31:03 AM »

Hmm. Yes.  Teaching when you're not officially a teacher can be a risky proposition.
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elisedance
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« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2013, 09:40:46 PM »

..but we all do it.  There's nothing wrong with it either, as long as you are honest about your own training/experience.   Of course if you charge for it then a different set of rules/standards/ethics kicks in...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

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« Reply #29 on: May 09, 2013, 11:57:19 PM »

..but we all do it.  There's nothing wrong with it either, as long as you are honest about your own training/experience.   Of course if you charge for it then a different set of rules/standards/ethics kicks in...

yes if you are charging then you better be right with your information Cheesy
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