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Author Topic: Dancing with different "schools"  (Read 626 times)
GreenEyes26
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Posts: 110



« on: March 12, 2011, 07:01:17 PM »

For those of you who recognize the differences in the different schools of ballroom dancing, what do you experience when you dance with someone whom you realize hasn't learned from the same one as you? Can you dance with that other person? Especially when one school that uses muscle power to dance the steps and has a certain body positioning while the other doesn't and has a different body positioning?
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"As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.”

 ~Ralph Waldo Emerson
QPO
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Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2011, 08:36:08 PM »

interesting. As I don't change too much I think the pedigree of my teachers comes from a similar school of thought but since there is no right or wrong way you can learn from all styles. In the end I think you are drawn to one school of thought and will keep with that until you find that you are not developing at the rate you think you should.

It could be that you will be disappointed because it does not give you the results you were expecting either but you can only find that out by trying.
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Dance Forum
Some guy
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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2011, 04:59:32 PM »

I think the question to me is, "is the person I'm dancing with enjoying it as much as I am?"  Grin  
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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 01:12:37 AM »

I think the question to me is, "is the person I'm dancing with enjoying it as much as I am?"  Grin  

well that certainly helps! and be desirable as you have to spend a reasonable amount of time with them you would hope so. Tongue
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Dance is a delicate balance between perfection and beauty.  ~Author Unknown
Dance Forum
pruthe
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Posts: 274



« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2011, 11:36:56 AM »

There is a YouTube where Amanda Owen (90s video) is asked if she thinks a good standard lady could dance with any good standard guy. She says yes, but seems to imply must be a high level standard lady in order to do so.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHX5yJsNSdw

This takes place where Amanda has just recently started dancing with Andrew Sinkinson. Maybe for us non-high level dancers, might take more time to learn to dance with a different partner with a different style of dancing. In this case, is it best for lady to try and change to match man's style?
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"It's not what you do, but how you do it."

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Some guy
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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2011, 04:03:14 PM »

I think the question to me is, "is the person I'm dancing with enjoying it as much as I am?"  Grin  

well that certainly helps! and be desirable as you have to spend a reasonable amount of time with them you would hope so. Tongue
Grin  Actually, I meant when the person you're dancing with is not your regular partner, such as in a social setting. I was assuming that your regular partner would be somewhat pleased with your dancing.   Cheesy
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elisedance
Administrator
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ee


« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2011, 04:36:14 PM »

I think the question to me is, "is the person I'm dancing with enjoying it as much as I am?"  Grin 

well that certainly helps! and be desirable as you have to spend a reasonable amount of time with them you would hope so. Tongue
Grin  Actually, I meant when the person you're dancing with is not your regular partner, such as in a social setting. I was assuming that your regular partner would be somewhat pleased with your dancing.   Cheesy


Apparently, that is often not the case even at the top levels of competition - though how sustainable that is I don't know.
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Some guy
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« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2011, 09:15:37 PM »

True, but that's a good thing.  It pushes both partners past their limits to improve.  I know coaches that won't teach couples who are perfectly happy with each other's dancing. 
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2011, 09:58:05 PM »

True, but that's a good thing.  It pushes both partners past their limits to improve.  I know coaches that won't teach couples who are perfectly happy with each other's dancing. 
I'd be far more suprized by that situation!!  It would show complacency with more than the partner...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
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