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Author Topic: Sharing practise floor: To move or not to move?  (Read 1470 times)
millitiz
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« on: February 19, 2011, 08:03:09 PM »

I don't know where to put this, so I am going to put it here.

So during today's practice, I was practicing Latin, and another couple was practicing Standard – all good and fine until at one point, I had a 180 degree turn, and suddenly, that Standard couple was just about an inch away from me – they passed by, but man that was close. But that is ok;  mean, it happens, especailly since the room was small, no big deal. Plus, admittedly, I was watching myself in the mirror, so I wasn't quite aware of their location. And 180 degree of turning was a bit abrupt, I suppose.

The part that really angered me was, the female, once they passed by, said to me, “can you move to the middle?” EXCUSE ME, you ran into MY space, and you asked me to move? WTH are you? Being as passive aggressive as I am, I did not move to the middle (although I did move to the side – I guess I am kinda nice).

I understand that in social dancing, people that does not move should stay at the middle of the dance floor. But this is a practice. And I was taught that, similar to social dancing, the moving couples (or the couples that move larger) bear the responsibilty to avoid the couples that do not move/barely move. The other reason why I didn't move to the center was because, I needed the mirror.

I think a big reason why I got really angry was because, the request sounded really selfish. She wanted me to move away because I was on her way – plus, she could at least be a bit polite – for instance, adding a please would help (not that I'd move to the middle – but I wouldn't be as angry, I suppose.)

My question is, am I right to hold my spot and space, or should I move to the middle (oh, and talking suppose to reduce the frustration level Wink )?

[title edited a bit ee]
« Last Edit: February 20, 2011, 02:18:29 AM by elisedance » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2011, 01:53:06 AM »

I don't know where to put this, so I am going to put it here.

So during today's practice, I was practicing Latin, and another couple was practicing Standard – all good and fine until at one point, I had a 180 degree turn, and suddenly, that Standard couple was just about an inch away from me – they passed by, but man that was close. But that is ok;  mean, it happens, especailly since the room was small, no big deal. Plus, admittedly, I was watching myself in the mirror, so I wasn't quite aware of their location. And 180 degree of turning was a bit abrupt, I suppose.

The part that really angered me was, the female, once they passed by, said to me, “can you move to the middle?” EXCUSE ME, you ran into MY space, and you asked me to move? WTH are you? Being as passive aggressive as I am, I did not move to the middle (although I did move to the side – I guess I am kinda nice).

Well there is a responsibility on everyone to know where the other is when practising and it is about learning floorcraft, when my partner and I practice we are always moving to a different spot to avoid people who are doing different styles. There is no need to get snakey..you may need to talk to the owner of the venue.

Quote
I understand that in social dancing, people that does not move should stay at the middle of the dance floor. But this is a practice. And I was taught that, similar to social dancing, the moving couples (or the couples that move larger) bear the responsibilty to avoid the couples that do not move/barely move. The other reason why I didn't move to the center was because, I needed the mirror.

this is different here. the slower ones tend to use the outside of the circle and the better ones use the inside of the circle. I do agree that those that that travel more need to keep an eye out for the slower ones. again it assists floorcraft skills. I do annoy my male partner sometimes as I see things and think he has not seen it  and that I will drop his arm or squeeze to let him know, which can put him off.

Quote
I think a big reason why I got really angry was because, the request sounded really selfish. She wanted me to move away because I was on her way – plus, she could at least be a bit polite – for instance, adding a please would help (not that I'd move to the middle – but I wouldn't be as angry, I suppose.)

My question is, am I right to hold my spot and space, or should I move to the middle (oh, and talking suppose to reduce the frustration level Wink )?

I think as I mentioned earlier if there is an issue speak with the owner of the venue, you are entitled to the space as much as they are  it is about compromise so everyone gets what they need
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2011, 02:17:37 AM »

At a practise its about sharing toys - there is only one floor and each couple needs to use it in a manner suitable for thier dance.  Apart from the issue of politeness (this would be easier to answer if she was not rude) each couple has to make allowances for the needs of the other one. 

We (open-level standard dancers) practise on a mid size floor and often share with open-level latin couples.  We are both need to practise routines - but they have different demands.  Most of the time a standard couple needs a long side but actually has some flexiblty with lateral movement (there are exceptions of course - complex corner or short side).  Latin couples, however, generally need a square region that is not violated since they are often working in paralell and have little or no control over floor craft (again exceptions include dances such as samba a lot of forward motion).  Great floor sharers are aware of the other couple's needs.  Our latin dancers may take one corner - giving us a whole long side to practise on.  As a rule, the better the dancers, the better their floor sharing skills are.  The best way to share is to talk before you start dancing and make clear what it is that you both need.

If you have a lot of couples on the floor you just ave to establish a small area where you work on a single step if necessary or, as Q said, practise your floor craft by weaving into the spaces - giving more room to intermediate dancers and (most important) leaving a wide space round professionals that are teaching. 
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cornutt
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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2011, 02:26:13 AM »

At our studio, if I am practicing and I'm doing something that doesn't travel, I try to get out of the "high traffic lane".  I go to the center of the floor, or if I'm using the mirror I go out near the edge of the floor, or I take a corner.  Smooth/standard dancers should not cut through the center of the floor (unless they are running through a show routine, but if they are, they need to find a time when the studio is less busy).  Having said that, it is indeed the responsibility of the moving dancers to see and avoid the stationary ones. 
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cornutt
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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2011, 02:30:46 AM »

Added though: To add to what EE said, rule #1 is always give way to instructors with students.  Besides being courteous to instructors who are trying to make a living, I've found that it's often wise to approach student dancers with the same care with which one approaches student drivers.   Grin
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elisedance
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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2011, 02:33:56 AM »

I agree C - but it also does not give open licence to latin dancers to be werever they like - for example to take a slice of the centre of the floor from one side to the other!  If there is limited mirror space that should also be sacrificed for sharing on a busy floor.

And on student drivers - yes, its a self-preservation thing if they are newbies - and with some of our pros its also a self-preservation thing Shocked
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cornutt
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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2011, 02:52:50 AM »

I see what you mean.  We don't usually have problems with the Latin dancers here -- I think they've all learned not to take up very much space.   Shocked
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elisedance
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« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2011, 04:40:46 AM »

 Like the two kinds of pedestrian?  - The quick and the dead....
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ttd
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« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2011, 02:01:15 PM »

When I'm in the studio practicing something stationary and someone else is doing something that moves LOD, I try to position myself not to block it. Also, I've seen instructors talking it out among themselves who takes up which part of the floor for their lesson - usually people working on smooth/standard get space along the walls while rhythm/latin people take the middle.
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dlgodud
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« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2011, 07:42:47 PM »

Well, with my experience, standard couple usually take more space which is the side of a floor. You might be in the line of dancing. As a person who dances latin, I usually take the space that does not overlap with standard couple. It is very normal being asked to move to somewhere in a crowded floor. But, it should be asked nicely.

One time, I almost kicked Vibeke Toft' hip. My teacher got freaked out. lol.
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cornutt
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« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2011, 08:19:23 PM »

One other thing we do is that, in the last 10 minutes or so of each hour, you are allowed to ask for a clear floor so you can run through a whole routine.  You can do this once an hour.  And you can expect that everyone else will watch and critique you afterwards.   Grin
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elisedance
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« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2011, 09:03:53 PM »

One other thing we do is that, in the last 10 minutes or so of each hour, you are allowed to ask for a clear floor so you can run through a whole routine.  You can do this once an hour.  And you can expect that everyone else will watch and critique you afterwards.   Grin

What a neat idea - but what happens if they are taking a lesson?  Or is this just for a practise session...
and I'd love to have the critique..
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cornutt
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« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2011, 11:35:34 PM »

What a neat idea - but what happens if they are taking a lesson? 

Most of the time instructors at our studio schedule their lessons on the hour, so at this point they are either wrapping up or between lessons.  If not, they just take the couple of minutes to review with their students.  Or, they have the students watch so that they can point things out.
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elisedance
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« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2011, 03:21:07 AM »

What a neat idea - but what happens if they are taking a lesson? 

Most of the time instructors at our studio schedule their lessons on the hour, so at this point they are either wrapping up or between lessons.  If not, they just take the couple of minutes to review with their students.  Or, they have the students watch so that they can point things out.

I wish social dances would have the occasional dance for competetive couples - everyone is still welcome on the floor but the understanding is that dancing will be for the zippy...  I think most social dancers would love to watch.
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cdnsalsanut
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« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2011, 04:01:56 AM »

My understanding is that dancers who are not moving should stay in the center, that is the proper etiquette, whether a social dance or a practice.

Some of the social ballroom clubs hereabouts have well defined rules of conduct on the dancefloor during social dancing: no stopping and talking for example. If a couple wants to discuss the finer points of technique they should do so from the sidelines, not stop in everyone's way to have a conversation. This doesn't apply to a practices; it's expected that people can stand where they are and try to figure things out. But even on a practice floor it is considerate to get out of the way of moving dancers.

I can understand being a bit put out if someone snits at you impolitely, but in this case they have a point and perhaps that's why they were a bit miffed. Don't take it personally, take the lesson from it.

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