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Author Topic: Taking a planned break  (Read 1958 times)
GreenEyes26
Mind Workers
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 110



« on: February 18, 2011, 07:24:41 AM »

In "dancers who aren't dancing," I was reading about how taking an unplanned break (because of injury or the inability to afford it) actually improved one's dancing. Why do you think this is? It almost makes me want to take a planned break and see what happens. But it would be very difficult...because I'd want to practice. What do you think?
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"As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.”

 ~Ralph Waldo Emerson
elisedance
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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2011, 08:10:33 AM »

Great question GE.  I think the same thing is reported in many skill-learning activitiies.  I took a few days break from my violin a week ago and was astonished at how I could actually play passages I was struggling with before.  Perhaps the brain gets a chance to consolidate - or more important you forget the hangups that have become a part of the learning process - you approach things anew.

Of course there has to be a balance between the benefits of taking a break and the hazzards of forgetting what you already know Smiley

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millitiz
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 220


« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2011, 04:20:39 PM »

Interesting ee. I actually had the same experience, too. I used to study Chinese painting. And at one point, I got really frustrated, because I couldn't paint the mounatin/stone in a particular way. I was not satisfied my my own practices (well, technically, I am never happy about my painting - it was more like, totally offending and barely tolerable). But back then, it was just awful - beside, my teacher didn't like it, too. I felt so defeated. So I told my teacher that I'd like to do some other style of painting - the equivalent of taking a break. And she was like, ok. After a few weeks, my teachers told me, M, it is about time to go back and do the real business (sigh - that soon? Undecided ). But when I started to paint again, Ca-boom babe! I could finally do it up to my minimal standard.

Later on during my training, there are weeks when I stopped painting (normally due to my exams - midterms and finals). After the breaks, I could always see my improvement. Back then, I thought it had something to do with some Zen thingy associated to Chinese painting - although from ee experience, it seemed to be something quite common.

I'd also like to add one more thing on planned break  (got the idea from Fascination of DF) - it would make you really want to dance during the break, and once you get back to the floor, you'd be very enthusiastic again!

Also, if you take a break, maybe your partner could have some time to catch up ;-).
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elisedance
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2011, 04:53:22 PM »

Was that ink painting?  I did that as a hobby for years - but have not for a long time.  Maybe I'm REALLY good now Cheesy
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
millitiz
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 220


« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2011, 05:15:07 PM »

Was that ink painting?  I did that as a hobby for years - but have not for a long time.  Maybe I'm REALLY good now Cheesy
Grin All hail the grand master Elisedance! I think so, maybe it is also called ink painting.
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GreenEyes26
Mind Workers
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 110



« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2011, 06:28:34 PM »


Also, if you take a break, maybe your partner could have some time to catch up ;-).

lol.
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"As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.”

 ~Ralph Waldo Emerson
QPO
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« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2011, 08:59:04 PM »

I am not sure either why this happens but I know it happened to me and my dancing has definitely improved. I wonder if you are more relaxed and less stressed to dance at a high standard. People could notice it in my partner as he was being more cautious not wanting to hurt me made his dancing softer. Perhaps it gives you a chance to put your dancing into perspective.

I think this will be like trying to explain Love! Tongue
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GreenEyes26
Mind Workers
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 110



« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2011, 11:07:12 PM »


I think this will be like trying to explain Love! Tongue

I wish PDO was like facebook so that I could "like" things people say. I want to do it all the time, and then become disappointed when I can't find a "thumbs up" sign.
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"As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.”

 ~Ralph Waldo Emerson
QPO
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Posts: 20824


Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2011, 11:38:33 PM »


I think this will be like trying to explain Love! Tongue

I wish PDO was like facebook so that I could "like" things people say. I want to do it all the time, and then become disappointed when I can't find a "thumbs up" sign.

 hope this is what you want!
« Last Edit: February 18, 2011, 11:42:17 PM by QPO » Logged

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elisedance
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« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2011, 05:22:08 AM »


I think this will be like trying to explain Love! Tongue

I wish PDO was like facebook so that I could "like" things people say. I want to do it all the time, and then become disappointed when I can't find a "thumbs up" sign.
Hey, you just did!

PDO is more laborious for sure - but it means we have a record of conversation rathen than an audience evaluating a performance (which is what FB sometimes is).  I wonder if FB would be a different place if they had a 'don't like' button too.  Might not be so friendly but it would certainly be more meaningful...

i suppose we could consider upgrading PDO onto a more sophisticated software - but I think that would mean archiving everything here and starting again Shocked   

But we could have a topic on this in the PDO area - better get back to taking a break!
Whiich makes me want a cup of tea Smiley
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Rugby
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2011, 10:52:55 PM »

You would have to mention tea.  Now I have to go get one.
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Some guy
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« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2011, 03:07:51 PM »

I think this happens because we forget the "how to" and we "just do it".  It's quite amazing when you use that approach to every thing you do. 

The key to just "do" it, is that you have to not worry about looking good while doing it.  That used to be my main hang up.  The form will be a result of the function, and that's one of the hardest things to trust and believe.  That's why it's important to learn (or have a teacher that will show you) the exact function.  When I worry about looking a certain way or I become afraid to look a certain way, attention and energy is diverted away from the action itself.  Goes back to how I learned to ride the bike: get on the bike and ride it.  The body learns it.  No one ever tells a learner to keep the handle bars steady and have a calm top line.  It became that way when the action perfected itself.   
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GreenEyes26
Mind Workers
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Posts: 110



« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2011, 01:23:34 AM »

So I posed this question a few months ago and it looks like I now have a dancing break in my life. After going straight for two years, taking a few days off at time here and there, I'm actually looking forward to a break. I'm looking forward to doing some non-dancing things that I haven't been able to do before. I'm looking forward to not choreographing routines and gearing up for the next season. I intend to continue practicing, but not remain under pressure to learn it fast and get it correct now. I hope this break won't last too long, but for now it is much needed and very welcome.
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"As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.”

 ~Ralph Waldo Emerson
elisedance
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« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2011, 03:58:17 AM »

So I posed this question a few months ago and it looks like I now have a dancing break in my life. After going straight for two years, taking a few days off at time here and there, I'm actually looking forward to a break. I'm looking forward to doing some non-dancing things that I haven't been able to do before. I'm looking forward to not choreographing routines and gearing up for the next season. I intend to continue practicing, but not remain under pressure to learn it fast and get it correct now. I hope this break won't last too long, but for now it is much needed and very welcome.

I hope it works for you.  I suppose the immediate question is 'when is a break a break and when is it an end?'  My experience with relationships at least is that 'breaks' are actually ends.  Is this also a test to see if you want to continue dancing as a main part of your life?  Or do you see yourself coming back refreshed and full of determination?  Also, how are you going to maintain your chops during the break - or is it going to be complete.  You have to realize that dancing requires a physical fitness that is self-sustaining - you stay able to dance more because you dance than any other excersize and once you let this go it may be very hard to get back to your current level again.
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
GreenEyes26
Mind Workers
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 110



« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2011, 07:17:34 PM »

This is definitely not an end. I'm in transition - changing jobs, cities, partners, coaches...changing my entire life, basically. As far as  maintaining, I guess I'm not worried. In some ways, I'm starting over. I see this break as inevitable, so I'm going to make the most of it. But the strive toward success in dancing has not stopped, it's just changed. I don't think it will ever stop, to be honest. It has become so integrated into my life.

Besides, I hear that people do well after breaks. Here's my chance to test this theory Smiley.
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"As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.”

 ~Ralph Waldo Emerson
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