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Author Topic: A majority of folks who are not members of ballroom dance forums  (Read 821 times)
dlgodud
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« on: February 15, 2011, 02:29:51 PM »

Well, my teacher said I am analyzing too much. Don't know if that is true or not. Because I hardly think myself as the one analyze dancing that much based on other members are posting here.
So I am just curious how other folks who are not members of ballroom dance forums are doing??
Maybe we are the most difficult ones to deal with for teachers and instructors?
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elisedance
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2011, 02:41:49 PM »

Its hard to make rules as I think it depends very much on how (and when) you learn.  For example, children learn dancing simply by being told to do something and then doing it.  It leads to fast learning - but to no understanding.  Adults can learn the same way but some of us need to know why as well as how - the idea (for me) is that I can then incorporate the lesson into a broader framework and use that in different situations without needing yet another lesson (see where this is going Wink ).

Most teachers love an involved student - one that challenges them.  I know I do, I can't stand the sponges and would much rather have a student that argues I am wrong.  If I can't defend my position effectively then I need to revisit it and maybe change my lesson.
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Rugby
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2011, 01:26:18 AM »

Its hard to make rules as I think it depends very much on how (and when) you learn.  For example, children learn dancing simply by being told to do something and then doing it.  It leads to fast learning - but to no understanding.  Adults can learn the same way but some of us need to know why as well as how - the idea (for me) is that I can then incorporate the lesson into a broader framework and use that in different situations without needing yet another lesson (see where this is going Wink ).

Totally agree.  In post-secondary school for medical professions I saw many people who were failing out because they had average scores of 60 to 65% on tests.  Then there were others, like myself, that scored 90% or higher on their tests.  Two months later I asked the average scorers questions from the exams and they could still answer about 55 to 60% of the questions correctly.  I then asked the high scorers the same questions but they, including myself, could only answer 25% to 30% of the questions correctly.  Like the children we could spit things back very accurately but didn't truly gain the understanding, so the knowledge  was really only short term.  The average scorers took the time to gain the understanding so in actuality retained more.  In reality they were the far better students and most likely would be better for the jobs.  In dancing I want to understand the mechanics and reasoning behind each step.  It may take me longer and I may not win as much in the short term but in the long run, like the averagers, I will become the far better dancer.          
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Everyone tries to rush up through the syllabus levles and think once they are at the top they have arrived.  What they don't realize is that by doing this it is like skimming through a book, you may get the gist but you will never understand the story.
phoenix13
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2013, 05:01:31 AM »

Interesting topic.

I have long thought that the online dance community is very skewed toward a certain type of dancer -- analytical, articulate, etc. This is not at all representative of the whole community of people who dance and I don't mean that in a bad way.   It takes all kinds to make a world, right.

I also think that things have loosened up quite a bit, now that FB is available as an option.  The dance conversations there tend to be a lot less cerebral,IMO,which opens the channel of communication for a lot of people who would never survive in the forum world.  My $0.02.
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elisedance
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2013, 03:29:33 PM »

I think PDO is less analytical than DF - though we had our moments our emphasis has always been on natural dance methods and less on mechanistic ones.  Least it was when DSV was here.
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
phoenix13
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2013, 06:50:58 PM »

That makes sense.  A lot depends on the mix of people, whether it's PDO or DF you're talking about. Although I have to admit that there were some conversations in DF back in the day that were completely and totally over my head. That's when there were (I think) three engineers , all from the same area, all in the same dance circles, all active in DF at the same time.  Whenever I saw any of their names, I moved right along.  Too analytical is too much for me.  Especially since they all dance or danced very high level standard, I never had a clue of what they were talking about.
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elisedance
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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2013, 08:40:47 AM »

That makes sense.  A lot depends on the mix of people, whether it's PDO or DF you're talking about. Although I have to admit that there were some conversations in DF back in the day that were completely and totally over my head. That's when there were (I think) three engineers , all from the same area, all in the same dance circles, all active in DF at the same time.  Whenever I saw any of their names, I moved right along.  Too analytical is too much for me.  Especially since they all dance or danced very high level standard, I never had a clue of what they were talking about.

I remember that - and it put me off even when I could understand it.  To me dance is an expression first and a mechanical thing a rather distant second.  The latter can certainly help with the former but it exhausts itself as the permuattions of the human body - let alone the differences between two people - are so great as to make the exercise just that an exercise.   Well, maybe a bit more but I still think you can learn more by just dancing!
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
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