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Author Topic: dealing with slippery floors  (Read 1672 times)
cdnsalsanut
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« on: December 05, 2010, 05:46:41 PM »

Speaking of slippery floors...

Any suggestions.

I often wet apaper towel or T-shirt and tread on that a bit but the shoes dry quickly. A teacher suggested soaking the shoes in castor oil, allowing them to dry then combing them out with steel brush. I'm about to do this on some old suede soled shoes just to try it out, tired of brushing them all the time and slipsliding around.

Can I use other oil instead of castor. What else do you suggest to keep the shoes grippy?
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"There are short-cuts to happiness, and dancing is one of them."
~Vicki Baum
QPO
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Adelaide South Australia


« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2010, 05:58:36 AM »

I bought some Italian shoes last yer and that is what the recommended. painting castor oil on it leting it dry and and then brushing it out before you use it....another thing that has worked well is wood wash.. wash the bottom of your shoes with  a woolwash and dont rinse it off.
there is also a superdance powder which I think might be wax very fine.

we often have to dance at a venue that has a very slippery floor (mostly dust) and they are not allowed to treat it...very frustrating and dangerous.
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2010, 06:21:30 AM »

but if you fix your shoes what happens if you have to then dance on a sticky floor?

better to work on your ballance so that neither set you back...
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dlgodud
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Posts: 773



« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2010, 02:43:58 PM »

but if you fix your shoes what happens if you have to then dance on a sticky floor?

better to work on your ballance so that neither set you back...

Hmmm.....Quite agree E!
I used to brush the shoes a lot, but not anymore. I am not kidding. When I started to realize that my balance gets better, I don't brush my shoes that often.
I found out that toe exercises help my balance. I am not kidding.
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2010, 03:24:44 PM »

I have come accross the occasional competition floor that is dangerous - but thats usually because of excessive stickyness and not because its slippery (though no doubt that is possible).  Slippery, you dance on your tush, sticky you break limbs...
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Some guy
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Posts: 1464


« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2010, 03:50:26 PM »

I have to go with EE on this.  The floor used to be the biggest cause for concern for me at a competition.  I switched coaches and we worked on a few things that made the floor a non-issue.  I can use my shoes longer now, I never brush the soles, and both my latin and standard shoes have an almost marble-like sole due to their age and wear-and-tear.  Not something  to brag about, but it sure is a huge weight lifted off when you don't have to ever worry about what the floor is going to be like.   
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cdnsalsanut
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« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2010, 05:47:51 PM »

I['ll try to castor oil idea on an old pair of shoes. See how that works.

I wear new shoes for competition and performance and they're grippier, better traction, but the old shoes, like you say, the soles are super smooth and polished and it's difficult when we do latin and have to really push from one foot to the other. I end up skating.
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"There are short-cuts to happiness, and dancing is one of them."
~Vicki Baum
skipper
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« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2010, 09:29:31 PM »

but if you fix your shoes what happens if you have to then dance on a sticky floor?

better to work on your ballance so that neither set you back...

Hmmm.....Quite agree E!
I used to brush the shoes a lot, but not anymore. I am not kidding. When I started to realize that my balance gets better, I don't brush my shoes that often.
I found out that toe exercises help my balance. I am not kidding.
Toe excersise??? Can you elaborate on this?
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QPO
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« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2010, 02:08:23 AM »

I myself have not had any issues with floors of late...especially comp floor, it is only at one social venue that I have problems with. Roll Eyes
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2010, 04:45:32 AM »

but if you fix your shoes what happens if you have to then dance on a sticky floor?

better to work on your ballance so that neither set you back...

Hmmm.....Quite agree E!
I used to brush the shoes a lot, but not anymore. I am not kidding. When I started to realize that my balance gets better, I don't brush my shoes that often.
I found out that toe exercises help my balance. I am not kidding.
Toe excersise??? Can you elaborate on this?
Toe pushups? We are intrigued...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
Rugby
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« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2010, 11:37:25 PM »

I['ll try to castor oil idea on an old pair of shoes. See how that works.

I wear new shoes for competition and performance and they're grippier, better traction, but the old shoes, like you say, the soles are super smooth and polished and it's difficult when we do latin and have to really push from one foot to the other. I end up skating.

I agree, in Standard I don't mind if the floor is a bit slippery but like cdnsalsanut mentioned in Latin I want the resistance of the floor to move as the movements are sharper and faster.   In both Latin and Standard I can keep my body over my leg and be balanced so it is not that but rather I use the floor to help create movement, stop movement and to change the direction of the energy.  I like to use the push and pull the floor with my feet technique in Standard too so not too slippery.   It is the same reason I used starting blocks when I competed in sprinting and why boxers use the floor, for traction and movement.  
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dlgodud
Open Bronze
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Posts: 773



« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2010, 10:50:06 PM »

but if you fix your shoes what happens if you have to then dance on a sticky floor?

better to work on your ballance so that neither set you back...

Hmmm.....Quite agree E!
I used to brush the shoes a lot, but not anymore. I am not kidding. When I started to realize that my balance gets better, I don't brush my shoes that often.
I found out that toe exercises help my balance. I am not kidding.
Toe excersise??? Can you elaborate on this?
Toe pushups? We are intrigued...

Nothing special. This is just my theory. So it is not scientifically proved probably.
Just try to move your toes, stretch and bent, and spread them.
I went to see a doctor on the other day because I have had a problem with my left hip, leg, and waist. So the doctor ran some test.
Interestingly, he tested the strength of both legs and tested toe strength of both.
I went to see a chiropractor and he tested the same way as the other doctor did.
And, the result was my left side is slightly weaker than my right side.
I recently started to lose my balance a lot, and was not comfortable with using my left side.

Also, I saw the picture of nerves that are connected to the spine and go all the way down to the toes.
So I was thinking that if I have more strength of my feet, I will probably have more balance and more grounded.
I don't know if it is a coincidence, but I have very strong feet and have good balance.
My previous teacher said I am most balanced one among his students.  Roll Eyes

In Chinese medicine, it says that feet are actually a miniature of your body. And, all your organs are connected to your feet.
So I guess something is connected??? Shocked


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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2010, 02:50:24 AM »

well, if your feet are not stable the rest of your body surely will not be - so maybe there is something in that.

Any reason given for the left side weakness?   
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
cornutt
Administrator
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« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2010, 11:16:37 AM »

I personally like fast floors.  But one thing I've done when my shoe soles got too slippery is simply walk outside and scuff them up on a concrete sidewalk.  Or, for more scuff, the edge of a step on a concrete stairway.  I've toyed with the idea of putting a wire brush on an electric drill and using that, but never actually tried it.
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elisedance
Administrator
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ee


« Reply #14 on: December 19, 2010, 03:10:26 PM »

I personally like fast floors.  But one thing I've done when my shoe soles got too slippery is simply walk outside and scuff them up on a concrete sidewalk.  Or, for more scuff, the edge of a step on a concrete stairway.  I've toyed with the idea of putting a wire brush on an electric drill and using that, but never actually tried it.

\

Do all men think alike?  My partner actually does just that.  His scuffing drill takes seconds to do the job...
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If you must leave the house, go build a home...

The limit of your love is also the limit of your art...
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