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Author Topic: AT Syllabus  (Read 5133 times)
Subliminal
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 36


« on: March 09, 2010, 05:49:29 PM »

So. I've been pondering this a while, why some of the more advanced dancers scoff at learning set patterns and why an AT syllabus is hard to do. I like Dave Bailey's syllabus, but as a guide for myself, I decided to make something a little more detailed.

Basically, the central theory behind my syllabus is the focus on the *transitions* rather than the moves themselves. For example, as a "bronze" step, I have transition from any of the follower's front, side, or backsteps into a giro. As a "silver" step, I have displace the follower with a forward step on her front pivot, sidestep, or back pivot.

Yes, it's complicated. Smiley but I think I've preserved the spirit of improvisation. And it'll give me something to work toward. If anyone is interested, I'll post more. I'm still thinking it through though.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2010, 06:09:08 PM by Subliminal » Logged
elisedance
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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2010, 05:56:52 PM »

Go for it!  I'm sure BTM will be around soon too...
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QPO
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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2010, 11:42:24 PM »

or Peaches.... Tongue they are way more proficent at it that I am
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2010, 04:22:12 AM »

I designed a syllabus while working with some friends from the Academia in BAires. It is very similar to what you are describing... teaches movements and techniques rather than steps/patterns. Each is listed by level of difficulty, and its possibilities of leads/follows. Post more.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
Subliminal
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 36


« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2010, 01:12:38 PM »

I'll post more tonight. Gotta clean it up a little first. Smiley

I had this idea about grouping movements by a central technique. The categories I came up with were Balance/Connection, Disassociation, Rotation, and Interruption. Now that I think about it more though, there is plenty of overlap, and I might be trying too hard to shoehorn things to fit my model.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2010, 10:07:30 PM by Subliminal » Logged
Subliminal
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 36


« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2010, 10:57:45 PM »

ok... *deep breath* Here it is. Disclaimer: I don't intend to teach anyone from this, it's for my own benefit and for anyone who's curious. Still, I'd love some feedback. Also, I know it's not complete, I don't think it ever could be. It's largely based on what I know is possible right now. The groupings are also kind of random, but there is some logic to it. It's more of a practice skill set... like if I want to work on disassociation one day, I'd go to that heading and pick a couple of the transitions to use in my practice. Oh, one more note. I'm just using "ocho" to mean a pivot step, I figure it's less confusing, as most people understand that's what an ocho is.



Beginner:


Connection/Balance:

 Open embrace
 Close embrace separate axis
 Transition from close to open and back


Walking:

 Hesitation step
 Weight change in place
 Sidestep to unled weight change
 Forward step to unled weight change
 Cross-system (3 track)
 Walk on follower's right
 Walk on follower's left
 Walking in a tight circle
 Rock turn
 

Disassociation:

 Walk to cross outside parallel
 Walk to cross outside cross-system
 Walk to cross in straight line
 Cross from follower's sidestep


Rotation:

 Cross-system walk to follower's pivot (ocho)
 Back ocho to giro
 Sidestep to giro
 Front ocho to giro
 Giro to back ochos
 Giro to sidestep
 Giro to front ochos
 Giro to cross
 Giro from pasada


Interruption:

 Parada interrupting follower's sidestep collect
 Parada on back ocho
 Parada on back ocho back foot
 Parada on front ocho
 Parada on front ocho back foot
 Pasada from parada
 Sammich from parada
 Pasada from sammich


Musicality:

 Use walk with emphasis on two basic rhythms, either Strong-Weak or Strong-Weak-Weak for waltz
 Syncopated steps on forward walks


Intermediate:


Connection/Balance:

 Apilado
 Breathing to emphasize lead


Walking:

 Rocksteps/hesitation steps in cross system
 Sacadas walking forward
 Lateral grapevine leader mirrors
 Lateral grapevine leader sidesteps doubletime
 Back step to unled weight change (or leader's cross Smiley )



Rotation:


 Sacada on front ocho
 Sacada on sidestep
 Sacada on back ocho
 Giro with enrosque
 Sacada to enrosque
 Enrosque to planeo
 Planeo to leader's cross
 Planeo to parada
 Calecita


Disassociation:

 Sacada on overturned front ocho
 Rockstep to forward follower's cross
 Rockstep to leader and follower mirror parallel cross
 Rocksteps outside partner


Interruption:

 Overturned back ocho to backwards pasada
 Parada to leader's pasada
 Barrida from parada
 Gancho on back ocho
 Gancho on front ocho
 Parada to leg wrap
 Fake pasada to sacada


Musicality:

 Change rhythm of giro to match musical phrase
 Syncopated steps on any movement to the rhythm
 Dance the melody or a part of the music other than the rhythm
 

Advanced:


Connection/Balance:

 Walk to volcada
 Mini-colgada to gain momentum


Walking:

 Maintain momentum/flow from interruption steps


Rotation:

 Back ochos with leader's double step
 Fast milonga front ochos
 Double pivots, follower front ocho, leader back ocho, or reverse
 Backstep into enrosque + giro

Disassociation:

 Leader's back sacada
 Follower's back sacada
 Follower's front sacada


Interruption:

 Barrida in giro to parada
 Boleo from back ocho
 Boleo from front ocho
 Parada to colgada
 Colgada to leg wrap


Musicality:

 Leader and follower on different rhythms
« Last Edit: March 12, 2010, 09:20:33 AM by Subliminal » Logged
elisedance
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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2010, 05:16:10 AM »

Wow!  Perhaps we could create the official PDO endorsed AT syllabus.
OTOH perhaps this is exactly what AT dancers don't want (I mean there is a lot of attitude Smiley)
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« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2010, 07:52:47 AM »

wow that is comprehensive. very impressed
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Subliminal
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 36


« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2010, 01:47:17 PM »

Thanks elise, qpo. I dunno about official, I doubt you could get any two tango dancers to agree on a syllabus. Wink

I've updated with a few more things. The intermediate goal of dancing to something other than the rhythm, and the backstep to enrosque. I put it under advanced. I'll be amazed if I can get that ever working consistently. Cheesy
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TangoDancer
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« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2010, 04:02:19 AM »

Your listing is fairly comprehensive, and should work well for you. 2 first glance suggestions, if I may....

1. In the very first section, there is much of connection, but not much of balance. You might want to include basic CPA work and rotation in this section. If one doesn't know how to maintain a proper CPA, or how to maintain balacne in/on one's own circle of movement, doing it w/ someone else in the mix is just that much more difficult.

2. There really is no need to interject SSQQS. Omit it. It is not typically in AT (only added since AT came into BR awareness), and it really shouldn't be in amer tango. Yes, it's played in int'l tango, but at least they, for the most part, have the foresight to ignore it. It is a complete misconception, and will serve only to prescribe some pretend cadence that seperates it from the rest of the dance.
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The most beautiful part of the dance is often found in between the steps... and in the movement within the stillness.
Subliminal
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 36


« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2010, 12:59:59 AM »

Thanks TD. I've omitted the SSQQS pattern. Yeah, it probably does more harm than good to list it.

Erm. I'm having a brain meltdown at the moment. What does CPA stand for in this case? Can you provide some examples of exercises you think are worthwhile? Thanks!

Also, adding cross-system linear sacadas and partners at 90 degrees to each other walking. That adds a bunch more possibilities... not sure how many transitions to list though. Maybe I'll add it as a transition from an ocho, that seems to be the most common way into it. Like "Front ocho to 90 degrees, stop follower's collect and walk backwards or forwards with follower sideways". That makes sense to me, do you know the movement I'm talking about?
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Subliminal
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 36


« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2010, 01:05:12 AM »

Ah, I've run out of time to edit the previous syllabus. Here's the new one. Smiley I've reorganized it a little too.


Connection/Balance:

Beg:
 Open embrace
 Close embrace separate axis
 Transition from close to open and back

Int:
 Apilado
 Breathing to emphasize lead

Adv:
 Walk to volcada
 Mini-colgada to gain momentum


Musicality:

Beg:
 Use walk with emphasis on two basic rhythms, either Strong-Weak or Strong-Weak-Weak for waltz
 Syncopated steps on forward walks

Int:
 Change rhythm of giro to match musical phrase
 Syncopated steps on any movement to the rhythm
 Dance the melody or a part of the music other than the rhythm

Adv:
 Leader and follower on different rhythms


Walking:

Beg:
 Hesitation step
 Weight change in place
 Sidestep to unled weight change
 Forward step to unled weight change
 Cross-system (3 track)
 Walk on follower's right
 Walk on follower's left
 Walking in a tight circle
 Rock turn

Int:
 Rocksteps/hesitation steps in cross system
 Sacadas walking forward
 Cross-system sacadas walking forward
 Lateral grapevine leader mirrors
 Lateral grapevine leader sidesteps doubletime
 Back step to unled weight change (or leader's cross)
 Front or back ocho to leader and follower at 90 degrees, prevent follower collect and walk forward or backward with follower sideways

Adv:
 Maintain momentum/flow from interruption steps


Disassociation:

Beg:
 Walk to cross outside parallel
 Walk to cross outside cross-system
 Walk to cross in straight line
 Cross from follower's sidestep

Int:
 Sacada on overturned front ocho
 Rockstep to forward follower's cross
 Rockstep to leader and follower mirror parallel cross
 Rocksteps outside partner

Adv:
 Leader's back sacada
 Follower's back sacada
 Follower's front sacada


Rotation:

Beg:
 Cross-system walk to follower's pivot (ocho)
 Back ocho to giro
 Sidestep to giro
 Front ocho to giro
 Giro to back ochos
 Giro to sidestep
 Giro to front ochos
 Giro to cross
 Giro from pasada

Int:
 Sacada on front ocho
 Sacada on sidestep
 Sacada on back ocho
 Giro with enrosque
 Sacada to enrosque
 Enrosque to planeo
 Planeo to leader's cross
 Planeo to parada
 Pivot follower in place, leader walks in a circle (Calecita)

Adv:
 Back ochos with leader's double step
 Fast milonga front ochos
 Double pivots, follower front ocho, leader back ocho, or reverse
 Backstep into enrosque + giro


Interruption:

Beg:
 Parada interrupting follower's sidestep collect
 Parada on back ocho
 Parada on back ocho back foot
 Parada on front ocho
 Parada on front ocho back foot
 Pasada from parada
 Sammich from parada
 Pasada from sammich

Int:
 Overturned back ocho to backwards pasada
 Parada to leader's pasada
 Barrida from parada
 Gancho on back ocho
 Gancho on front ocho
 Parada to leg wrap
 Fake pasada to sacada

Adv:
 Barrida in giro to parada
 Boleo from back ocho
 Boleo from front ocho
 Parada to colgada
 Colgada to leg wrap
« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 12:09:33 PM by Subliminal » Logged
David Bailey
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 55


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« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2010, 08:37:57 AM »

So. I've been pondering this a while, why some of the more advanced dancers scoff at learning set patterns and why an AT syllabus is hard to do. I like Dave Bailey's syllabus,
And so you should, it's magnificent.

but as a guide for myself, I decided to make something a little more detailed.
If you look here, you'll see I have specific class notes for each session:
http://www.learningtango.com/ClassNotes.html
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David Bailey
Intermediate Bronze

Posts: 55


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« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2010, 08:44:56 AM »

Ah, I've run out of time to edit the previous syllabus. Here's the new one. Smiley
That's a loooong list...

My personal opinion is that it's too many steps for a course, assuming the course is (say) 8 weeks, rather than 50 or so. The more you focus on steps, the more you get away from technique.

I also think that it's very terminology-heavy, which doesn't help if you don't know what the terminology means. I keep forgetting what a parada is, for example, although I'm pretty sure I know it and may even have taught it. So you should avoid "move names" - for example, use "pivot" instead of "ocho".

I did a review of the DVIDA syllabus, here:
http://www.jivetango.co.uk/Teaching/ASyllabusExamined.html

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Bordertangoman
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« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2010, 08:50:58 AM »

I'll be back; but get rid of the paradas.
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