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Author Topic: The perfect follower (PF) .... what is she like?  (Read 13624 times)
elisedance
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ee


« Reply #30 on: January 11, 2010, 11:37:01 PM »

I agree - social dancing is no less a skill than competetive, its just directed in a different way towards being able to dance well with anyone as apart (dancesport) of dancing well with one person.  Its the generalist vs the specialist - each has its own skill set...
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albanaich
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« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2010, 10:22:02 AM »

I'm not sure you can seperate frame and connection.

Certainly you can maintain conection in Swing without leading from the body, but its messy (and not how I was taught) . I was taught to lead from the body. When you step back on a left side or right side pass its the body and body frame that is leading. The arm is essentially the 'shock absorber' that transmits that movement, the amonunt of 'tension' or springiness that is maintained in the arm is 'the connection' - but its is a firmly held body movement 'frame' that intiiates the action.

In Argentine Tango we transmitt the energy of the movement less through the arms and more through the movemant and 'frame' of the upper torso (you get slapped about if you try to use your arms), the idea is essentially the same though, to maintain a compression/tension between the leader that transmitts the movement and change of direction in one to the other.

I don't know the situation in ballroom very well, because no one had ever gone to any great leanghty to explain 'frame' or 'connection'. In dealing with other novices who clearly hadn't been told about it either, I ended up using what I learned fro AT and Swing to explakn how to dance which is basically, you move your body, she moves her body, she is then forced to move her foot to support her wieght, you move forward into the space provided. Body first, feet after.

It's not rocket science, but it comes that way when you got kids stressing about what the correct steps are and whether they are in time to the music. Get the idea of lead and follow right and the rest with follow, try and teach steps and timing without lead and follow and you get people who can do steps but can't actually dance.





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Bordertangoman
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« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2010, 11:46:43 AM »

I had the perfect answer but then I thought that mind offend some people; so I am keeping it to myself.....
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« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2010, 12:32:59 PM »

I agree - social dancing is no less a skill than competetive, its just directed in a different way towards being able to dance well with anyone as apart (dancesport) of dancing well with one person.  Its the generalist vs the specialist - each has its own skill set...

One of my teachers used to say that to become a great dancer, you need to be a great social dancer with a great top line and a great presentation.

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cdnsalsanut
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« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2010, 12:41:41 AM »

She follows! 

I had an interesting recent experience around this subject.  My regular competative partner was down with an injury so I competed with another lady, a very good dancer and a superb follow.

I don't know if it's age, or nerves, fatigue, early onset alhzeimers, but whatever the reason, in a few of the dances, especially by the end of the day into the finals rounds at a dancesport event, I drew a blank. The routine left the room, had a bathroom break, went to look for a better partner, I don't know. I just know I'm dancing, not quite sure how I got there and no clue what I just did or what I'm supposed to do next.

This is where social dancing helps. I social dance A LOT. Every weekend. I'm going through an ordeal trying to find good partners or a regular partner for social, but still manage to get out regularly.  So...I just danced. And she followed. I kept it simple and evenually regained some of my routine.

The upshot was, in watching the video's (We won!) that nobody could tell we were off track. We were still ontime and dancing well, it looked good.  Good enough, apparently. But the fact is that it wasn't our routine.

If I deviate from our routine with my regular partner she gets a bit flustered, sometimes stops or else follows the routine, which is quite interesting to watch, since I go one way and she goes another...

I won two competitons with the excellent follow, it'll be interesting to see how it goes with my regular partner.  We've had many discussions around it, for she stops even in practicce and I keep saying that what we do in practice we'll do in competition.  We have to keep going..."just follow and we'll be fine". Easier said than done...
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #35 on: January 14, 2010, 04:32:24 AM »

I agree - social dancing is no less a skill than competetive, its just directed in a different way towards being able to dance well with anyone as apart (dancesport) of dancing well with one person.  Its the generalist vs the specialist - each has its own skill set...

One of my teachers used to say that to become a great dancer, you need to be a great social dancer with a great top line and a great presentation.

That is deeper than one might first think.  Great social dancers look totally at ease on the floor, even when they are dancing for the first time with that partner.  I assume thats what your coach was getting at.  I think it needs a topic...
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dlgodud
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« Reply #36 on: January 16, 2010, 11:43:38 PM »


She is lovely -- or at least she is while she's dancing with you


One of my teachers said that I am lovely. hahaha.....
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« Reply #37 on: January 17, 2010, 01:39:36 AM »

I look forward of someone say that to me.
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dlgodud
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« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2010, 08:45:44 AM »

I look forward of someone say that to me.

I am sure you are. Some people are just shy to say such a thing to a lovely lady.
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #39 on: January 17, 2010, 08:51:46 AM »


She is lovely -- or at least she is while she's dancing with you


er, so far so good, but might I worry what I was when I wasn NOT dancing with him...?
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SwingWaltz
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« Reply #40 on: January 17, 2010, 09:04:38 AM »

She's drop dead gorgeous! I might have found her.  Roll Eyes
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #41 on: January 17, 2010, 09:16:33 AM »

She's drop dead gorgeous! I might have found her.  Roll Eyes

I would have thought (hoped) looks were irrelevant to following quality... but I see you are thinking of a specific case Cheesy
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catsmeow
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« Reply #42 on: January 18, 2010, 08:32:31 PM »

Using a trained top line in social dancing is disrespectful . Many, if not most, of the dancers have not had the opportunity to go beyond a social looking frame. I am one of them. I enjoy the look of a good frame in its proper place but when done out of place it is merely boasting. Maybe there otta be another law. My apologies in advance for ruffling any feathers here. This just how I thihk.
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elisedance
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ee


« Reply #43 on: January 18, 2010, 09:16:47 PM »

I actually see what you mean - if you go into full dancesport frame you might intimidate yoru partner and make others think you are showing off?

I see what you mean, but I don't think I really agree.  its polite to dance to the level of your partner and, perhaps a bit above.  I think providing a good frame actually makes it easier for your partner to dance - else why was it developed?  As to the showing off, my experience is that most social dancers (least in the places I like to go) want to see well trained dancers - far from thinking it showing off they see it as a show - and something to aspire to.

We always dance as far-out as the environment will permit (obviously knocking people over is rude!!) but I have never had the slightest hint that people think we are showing off - after all what are they doing??  I think most people on the floor like the idea that someone is lookng at them and admiring, whether dancesport or beginner.
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catsmeow
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« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2010, 09:21:39 PM »

Thanks for replying EE. Your post brings up another question for me. Is a fully developed frame really comfortable? For me to hold it ninety seconds long can be a trying experience.
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