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 81 
 on: May 15, 2015, 06:26:05 PM 
Started by elam63 - Last post by elam63
What do you think about their style?

https://vimeo.com/127653036

 82 
 on: May 15, 2015, 12:04:24 PM 
Started by phoenix13 - Last post by Some guy
Walking is also a great stamina builder and great for the overall mental well being by getting out into the fresh air and sunshine.  I don't mean a light saunter around the block... Go find somewhere with some rise and fall tot the terrain and plot out a route.  Walk a well articulated foxtrot walk around the course to a light, faster social foxtrot and you gain from it.   It's not all about the dance, but it is... Bestir you can take your dog along too!  They love a brisk workout!

"If you can walk, you can dance" - Zimbabwean Proverb.

I think the problem is, most people try to learn to dance before they learn, or rather, re-learn how to walk. 

 83 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:52:13 AM 
Started by dancinginthemoonlight - Last post by Some guy
It is basically where you create your center of gravity I personally feel.

Some people carry it too high, up at their sternum.  It belongs about 2-3 fiber widths above and below the belly button.  The task of finding it and connecting to your partner with it is easiest using mental imagery.  

Yep! Then comes the confusion between center of gravity and the active centers!  Cheesy  Women carry their center of gravity around the hips, and men carry it around the rib-cage.  The structural development difference gives that away.

I think putting, "more weight into the floor", is a band-aid to fix something else that is seriously wrong somewhere else.  Most teachers have no idea what's causing it, so they tell you to apply foot pressure and all sorts of horrible things that'll damage your feet, make you lose toenails, give you bone spurs, bunions, whatnots.

If you hear, "more weight into the floor", or anything of that sort, run away: this teacher can recognize pieces of the puzzle, but has no idea how to fit them together.  This could end up damaging your body, sometimes irreparably, or worse: make your dancing feel bad!  Tongue

 84 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:51:52 AM 
Started by dancinginthemoonlight - Last post by sandralw
As I think back over the course of my competitive dance career most of it was Pro/Am.  Because of always being petite it was difficult finding boy partners when I was young who didn't tower over me.  As an adult it was just about the same.

My first "partner" was my dad, as a father/daughter entry (yep, they had this stuff back in the day) and that was loads of fun!  Then I had a little boy partner until he shot up to be heads and shoulders taller.  That's when I started pro/am.  It was different when my parents needed to drive me to the studio as I was too young to drive, but we also had many studios in the area to choose from and they made the choice of whom I was to dance with for me.

As I was older and out driving on my own I began looking farther afield for someone higher up and out on the circuit.  My choices had to do with (at first) stature and knowledge with the ability to teach me what I needed to know.  Even though driving into Manhattan wasn't far, it could take forever sometimes.  Traffic could be a nightmare, but it was well worth the trip.  On my final leg of my journey I was fortunate to fins a pro/am pro well qualified back in my home state of New Jersey to suit me at the time.  Traffic could still be a challenge, but tolls were cheaper and the trip less of an effort.

The coaching became the thing then... Traveling to SW London 3-4 times a year with Blackpool for the Open added in...

How far will you go?  As far as you wan to I guess...

 85 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:45:36 AM 
Started by elisedance - Last post by Some guy
That's what happens when you teach form and no function, or function is shoe-horned into some higher priority form.  The frame is a result of properly holding, really holding, the lady.  Not a one-size-fits-all cage to entrap her in.   

 86 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:32:31 AM 
Started by phoenix13 - Last post by sandralw
Yes Elise,

And I've never regretted it.  I've backed away from the intensity of competing now as I'm older and enjoy my role as educator.  I have always enjoyed the physicality of it and passing along the cumulative information I have collected from the myriad of sources I have been very fortunate to have learned from.  Once dance is in your blood it is there for life.

 87 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:23:52 AM 
Started by phoenix13 - Last post by sandralw
Walking is also a great stamina builder and great for the overall mental well being by getting out into the fresh air and sunshine.  I don't mean a light saunter around the block... Go find somewhere with some rise and fall tot the terrain and plot out a route.  Walk a well articulated foxtrot walk around the course to a light, faster social foxtrot and you gain from it.   It's not all about the dance, but it is... Bestir you can take your dog along too!  They love a brisk workout!

 88 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:19:08 AM 
Started by dancinginthemoonlight - Last post by sandralw
More weight into the floor... I understand the phrase, but difficult to articulate the answer as it is a sensory awareness... As a skater I had to learn to drop my weight into the floor for a good connection into the floor on Roller, or into the ice.  It took time to become aware of the skating surface under my foot.  It helped me greatly transferring this onto the dance floor at the time (I was a kid at the time) ...

It is basically where you create your center of gravity I personally feel.

Some people carry it too high, up at their sternum.  It belongs about 2-3 fiber widths above and below the belly button.  The task of finding it and connecting to your partner with it is easiest using mental imagery. 

A good exercise is to stand, eyes close hand to hand with your partner both facing each other, feet slightly apart.  Do not make yourself move, but think yourself to transfer your weight from one foot to the other through your use of your center.  Aback and forth, back and forth, left foor to right foot.  Not as an active transfer, but a passive one.  When your partner can feel and follow this transference you know that you have just dropped your weight into the floor.

Still difficult to speak in words what I give as an exercise to my students over the course of a lesson in a few sentences on a piece of paper. It comes through the floor, up the leg, through the center, down the other leg, into the floor and the turns around and goes back again. 

This is what is called "Being well grounded."


 89 
 on: May 15, 2015, 10:48:50 AM 
Started by sandralw - Last post by sandralw
Bit of a commute from here Shocked Smiley but who knows, I do travel...

Please be sure to drop a line... Let me know ...

I am fortunate that I have a smallish dance floor in my home I teach on.  25'x25 is not bad..
 Cheesy

 90 
 on: May 15, 2015, 10:41:33 AM 
Started by elisedance - Last post by sandralw
There are a number of books that give great insight into the roots of the dancing.  Unfortunately most are also quite a rare find.  I have "Just One Idea" by Len Scrivner, which is a fascinating read, as is the book on the Castles (Vernon and Irene) and a few by Arthur Murray.

They all have something to say.  All we need to do is listen and we will understand ....

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