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 71 
 on: May 16, 2015, 02:33:40 AM 
Started by dancinginthemoonlight - Last post by sandralw
That is why I was so lucky when Bill Irvine introduced me to the Alexander Technique.  It was the best thing that ever happened.  It saved my body.  Also the book "The Thinking Body" by Mabel Todd. 

Ah, the power of relaxation!  Lucky you.,

Actually yes, I was very lucky.  I've said that often.  I used to be an Equestrian.  I, unknowingly, used The Alexander Technique when doing Dressage, Saddle Seat Equitation and even just in general having a day out.  I didn't realize quite what I'd been doing in order to communicate with the horse.  I was dropping my energy (weight) through my sits bones, into the spine of the horse.  Then he was communicating his energy upwards through my front of my body and out the top of my head simultaneously.  My shift of weight and energy could slow him down or speed him up also. 

Once I became aware that what I had done through instinct at first and later through training both as a rider and as a dancer was aligned in the same use of energy I began to move more easily and with breath.

The increas in breat also creates an increase in energy.  The silent "Ah..."

 72 
 on: May 16, 2015, 02:25:48 AM 
Started by phoenix13 - Last post by sandralw
Cheesy

Hee ... Hee... Hee...

 73 
 on: May 16, 2015, 02:22:41 AM 
Started by elisedance - Last post by sandralw
Interesting to hear the Gentleman's thought processes in all of this.  As Lady we "believe" that our Gentleman is to present us in the best possible way.  If that means he must adapt in some way to his Lady in order for her to dance within her space of the partnership, then so be it. Of course this is not exactly so.

 We each have our jobs to do within the partnership.  In the dance the sum of the parts exceeds the whole.  Neither one can create proper movement without the other as we dance in opposition to each other in order to create the cyclonic effect of the "Big Top". I, as Lady would end up lying on the floor in a heap. 

It is a balance - counterbalance that gives us the means by which we move together.  If one outsized the other by a little then there needs only be a slight adjustment to make everything balance out.  If, on the other hand there is a good deal of difference, more adjustments need to be made.

It not need be only through the positioning of the arms and shoulder line when taking hold.  It can alsobe a softening of the knees and ankles which could come into play which would allow for the size difference to be not quite so evident.

If each dances only to suit themselves and not attempt to suit each other then this is where the problem will begin... And end I'm sure.

 74 
 on: May 16, 2015, 12:06:42 AM 
Started by elam63 - Last post by Some guy
"Ouch!"

 Cheesy

I find it interesting that they work so hard to create the illusion of speed without actually traveling fast. It's akin to riding a bicycle at a snail's pace and then leaning into each turn like a motorcycle Grand Prix racer would. There is something to be admired about that ability, kind of like WWF wrestlers can be admired for what they do, but it's not the real thing.

 75 
 on: May 16, 2015, 12:03:50 AM 
Started by phoenix13 - Last post by Some guy
 Cheesy

 76 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:49:22 PM 
Started by elisedance - Last post by Some guy
Yep.  If they both follow the idea of the Gentleman is the frame and his Lady the picture than if his frame does not fit the picture what an ugly picture...  Tongue

I totally agree with the image!

However, male perspective on frames differ, and the analogy is lost on most men.  Don't get me wrong, we know what a frame is, and we can even build you one, a generic one, well, most of us probably can, but don't be surprised if the frame we build has little to no consideration of how it should match or compliment the picture in any way.  All we need to usually know are the dimensions and maybe, color.   Grin

How many single men do you know own picture frames that were not bought by a girlfriend or lady friend?  At least in my circle of about 20 guy friends from high school and college, the answer is zero.  Supposing there was an outlier who did have a frame, I can count on less than one finger how much thought was put into how important it was for the frame to actually match and suit the picture. I guess the, "frame", reference means many things to many people. The analogy itself is beautiful, but in order to bring about the right function, it seems to fall short in a lot of male brains. A picture frame, however good, is rigid, it goes around the picture, and if it's a reusable frame (is their any other kind?...!) you can go through many photos in one frame without having to adjust the frame one bit.

Also, if you ask men to portray something, they typically use their arms, and almost only arms and some times, legs, to portray that which you are asking. The body is rarely brought into it because we're just not mentally programmed to feel and express with our bodies: that should be innate, yes, but society beats it out of us by the time we are about 8 yrs old. We like tinkering, playing with things, and holding things. Even our equipment (ahem!) is outside of our body.

However, the concept of an embrace, with the right energy flowing through the body, arms, etc, seems to fix this misconception of a rigid one-size fits all, "MUST maintain rigidity at all costs", image. Then again, society beats out what constitutes a real touch and an embrace too, so that usually needs to be reinstalled. Basically, everything good dance teachers ask of us are beaten out of us by the time we are about 8. However, it is possible to take us back to 7 and remind us what it was, and tell us that's how it's supposed to be.

So how does this all relate to height?  There's the other form factor that we are taught to believe by really bad dance teachers: that the couple has to match, somehow for the dancing itself to be good. The frame doesn't yield, you just have to find the right picture, and if the picture isn't the right size, oh well, it's not gonna look or feel right.  Roll Eyes For competition, maybe there is some matching aesthetic that will give you an advantage, but as it pertains to dancing well, I don't believe there is, unless hugging some prescribed height of a person feels better than others.

 77 
 on: May 15, 2015, 11:25:18 PM 
Started by dancinginthemoonlight - Last post by Some guy
That is why I was so lucky when Bill Irvine introduced me to the Alexander Technique.  It was the best thing that ever happened.  It saved my body.  Also the book "The Thinking Body" by Mabel Todd. 

Ah, the power of relaxation!  Lucky you.,

 78 
 on: May 15, 2015, 06:47:45 PM 
Started by phoenix13 - Last post by sandralw
When a new student phones in asking about lessons the beginner is very hesitant.  I always ask... Can you walk forward?  Can you walk backwards?  Can you take a step to the side?  Can you count to 8?  If all of the answers are yes, then you can dance... Now I teach you to walk the floor in time to the music...

 79 
 on: May 15, 2015, 06:43:40 PM 
Started by elisedance - Last post by sandralw
Yep.  If they both follow the idea of the Gentleman is the frame and his Lady the picture than if his frame does not fit the picture what an ugly picture...  Tongue

 80 
 on: May 15, 2015, 06:33:08 PM 
Started by dancinginthemoonlight - Last post by sandralw
That is why I was so lucky when Bill Irvine introduced me to the Alexander Technique.  It was the best thing that ever happened.  It saved my body.  Also the book "The Thinking Body" by Mabel Todd. 

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